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INFP Relationships with other MBTI Types

The INFP type is one of the rarer Myers-Briggs personality types. Making up just 4.4% of the U.S population, INFP people have a unique combination of traits. Very intuitive, sensitive, and empathetic, they adhere very strictly to their moral understanding of the world. As a result, people might sometimes view them as stubborn or too set in their ways. However, INFPs are simply dedicated to understanding themselves, and the world, better. Even though they have a very clear understanding of what they like and dislike, this doesn’t mean that they can’t have harmonious relationships with others.

Not sure what your Myers-Briggs personality type is? You can easily find out by taking our comprehensive personality test.

This article will take a closer look at the INFP’s relationship compatibility with the 15 other Myers-Briggs personality types. To fully explore INFP relationships, we must also answer:

  • What is the INFP partner like?
  • Who is the best match for an INFP?
  • Which types make the best friends for INFPs?
  • Which types have a good working dynamic with INFPs?

INFP Relationships and Dating

The INFP personality type takes their personal relationships very seriously. They place a lot of importance on establishing meaningful relationships, which sometimes can be a difficult task given how introverted they are. Making connections with others requires talking to them first, which can be a challenge for the reserved INFPs. Another potential issue is the INFP’s high standard when it comes to the people they surround themselves with — both friends and especially romantic partners. When it comes to romance, INFPs are willing to wait a considerable amount of time to find their “perfect” soulmate. Casual dating and relationships hold little to no interest for INFPs, who resist shallow or flighty attachments. However, when they find a deep connection with another person, INFPs will remain extremely appreciative and loyal.

INFP Dating

Given INFPs’ sincerity and depth of personality, it’s no wonder that they make fantastic partners. This personality type has the amazing ability to make others feel heard and understood and will not take their romantic relationship for granted. They are aware that they need to value their partner daily, which they are eager to do, unconditionally. INFPs are able to create very deep, almost spiritual bonds with their partners, which they take very seriously. To them, being intimate with another person isn’t all about physical interaction, but rather a way to share mind, body, and soul. INFPs acknowledge that a relationship isn’t a passive commitment, but a way for both partners to learn, grow and develop as time passes by.

INFP Best Match

If an INFP wants to find a compatible romantic partner, the best INFP matches would likely be ENFJs and ENTJs. Since these extroverted personalities also share the Intuitive preference with INFPs, it is likely that they will be able to relate to their INFP partner better than types with other preferences. Furthermore, an ENFJ’s or ENTJ’s extroverted nature can complement the shy, introverted Mediator quite well. Even if at times these two Myers-Briggs types can appear worlds apart from INFPs, this is a good thing, as both sides have plenty of opportunities to grow in the relationship and see the world from a completely different point of view.

Other good matches for INFPs would include the INTP, INFJ, INTJ, and other INFPs. These types are likely to be compatible with each other because they have a good understanding of the Idealist’s personality and mindset. However, as all of these personality types are introverted and reserved, it can be a challenge to form a connection, as neither introvert would be likely to make the first move. However, given the proper time for a bond to develop, these relationships have the potential to truly blossom.

INFP Compatibility

INFPs are so intuitive and empathetic that it’s easy for them to pick the right topic to discuss with any other Myers-Briggs personality type. However, some types aren’t attracted to INFPs’ moralism and can easily find them stubborn, boring, or too mature. Typically, INFPs get along better with Intuitive types, rather than Sensing ones. The rest of the article addresses INFPs relationship compatibility with all the other MBTI types — what works and what doesn’t in terms of romance, friendship, and work.

INFP Compatibility Chart

To illustrate INFP’s compatibility with other personality types, we have made a chart, divided by each temperament type. The color coding for the chart is as follows:

Blue – Types that are most similar to INFPs in terms of values, interests, and life philosophy.
Green – Types that are quite similar to INFPs but have intriguing differences, which can produce a healthy relationship with plenty of personal growth opportunities.
Yellow – Types that are somewhat similar to INFPs and could be compatible with them, but some work will be needed to maintain healthy relationships.
Red – Types that are almost polar opposite to INFPs and are likely to clash with their personality. Relationships between these types will require a lot of work.

INFP Compatibility Chart

INFP and ESTJ

These two personality types fall in the “red zone” of the compatibility chart. They don’t have much in common and their widely contrasting views on life can cause friction between them.

Relationship

A relationship between an INFP and an ESTJ could be very rocky, because of their differing views of the world. Even though they share the same cognitive functions, the order is reversed, which means that the two personality types place value on completely opposite things. The soft-spoken, inwardly-oriented, and idealistic INFP, with their tendency to daydream, might not appeal to the grounded, matter-of-fact ESTJ. Furthermore, INFPs tend to avoid conflict and try to resolve it with sympathy and empathy when avoidance isn’t an option. ESTJs, on the other hand, seek more practical solutions; they will do whatever they deem necessary, no matter what outside opinions they receive. These two types have big differences in their levels of emotional sensitivity. However, with communication and understanding from both types, their mismatched characteristics could be beneficial, inspiring them to grow and see other points of view.

Friendship

INFPs and ESTJs have varying values when it comes to friendship, too. INFPs are much better at providing emotional support to their friends and prefer to connect with them on a deeper level. In contrast, ESTJs are more practical and would be quicker to offer a logical solution to a problem than to empathize with the other person. To an INFP, this can come across as cold-hearted and insensitive, and, as a deeply feeling type, they wouldn’t be able to fully comprehend this type of reaction. If they are able to understand the good intentions behind their differing approaches, however, this contrast in values can benefit INFP and ESTJ friendships.

At Work

INFPs and ESTJs can make for stellar work partners. They both are principled and dependable, taking their responsibilities and deadlines extremely seriously. They both like to be left alone to do their job their way, although ESTJs have a tendency to micromanage. This can discourage an INFP, as they can feel the ESTJ criticizing their work. This could cause some frustration in the workplace if both sides don’t take the time to adjust and find a balance that allows each of them to flourish.

INFP and ESFJ

These two personality types fall in the “red zone” of the compatibility chart. They don’t have much in common and their widely contrasting views on life can cause friction between them.

Relationship

INFPs and ESFJs are united by similar goals: commitment, loyalty, and emotional connection. The ESFJ personality type doesn’t have a problem showing affection and being romantic, and INFPs appreciate this. However, because of their many differences, these two personality types can quickly get on each other’s nerves. ESFJs are very traditional and want to do things the way they have “always” been done. INFPs, on the other hand, are imaginative and don’t want to be held back from exploring new possibilities. The extroverted ESFJ is sometimes overwhelmingly energetic and fast-paced compared to the more reserved INFP, who takes more time to decide how they feel about certain things. The contrast between their Sensing and Intuition preferences could also make it hard to find topics to discuss over time. This is because an ESFJ may prefer to discuss tangible, real-life problems that actually affect them, while an INFP may want to explore an abstract idea for the fun of it.

Friendship

INFPs and ESFJs would get along better in friendship if they focused on what they have in common: the gift for caring about people’s well-being. Yet, both INFPs and ESFJs have a lot to learn from each other’s differences as well, which lie mainly in their differing Sensing/Intuitive preferences. ESFJs can learn from INFPs to be more creative and open to new ideas, especially when it comes to thinking more about future goals. In return, INFPs can learn from ESFJs how to be more detail-oriented and practical in many different aspects – thinking, deciding, planning, and acting.

At Work

ESFPs are good at focusing on details, whereas INFPs often see the big picture and bring high levels of originality and creativity to their careers. INFPs also care about their colleagues on a deeper level and bring a sense of empathy to the workplace. ESFJs complement many of INFP’s weaknesses; they are more grounded and organized and can keep INFPs from forming unrealistic ideals. This could be helpful for the visionary INFP, but micromanaging them too much isn’t a good idea. In return, INFPs can help ESFJs access their creativity and originality when problem-solving.

INFP and ISTJ

These two personality types fall in the “red zone” of the compatibility chart. They don’t have much in common and their widely contrasting views on life can cause friction between them.

Relationship

INFPs and ISTJs are a rare romantic pairing. They don’t have much in common and don’t share any cognitive functions in their individual stacks. In a relationship, INFPs want romance, support, love, and quality time. ISTJs, on the other hand, place great importance on traditions; they are driven by dependability and practicality and want to do things “the proper way”. This is where a clash of inner values may occur. ISTJs are often very set in their ways and don’t like to think outside the box, which can clash with the INFP’s creativity and even make them feel unappreciated. ISTJs, on the other hand, may often struggle to make sense of the INFP’s behavior, which they perceive as highly irrational.

Friendship

INFPs and ISTJs make unlikely friends, even though both types share a common sense of responsibility. Unlike the adaptable and imaginative INFP, ISTJs are notoriously inflexible. They tend to follow the rules and act according to an established set of regulations. They don’t like going out of their way to try new things or to approach a problem from a different perspective. Furthermore, there is a big difference in how these two make decisions – Thinking makes ISTJs objective and logical while Feeling drives INFPs to decide from their hearts. ISTJs are also perceived as judgmental and demanding companions, which isn’t something that the more sensitive INFP can tolerate for long.

At Work

On the surface, it may seem as if an ISTJ and an INFP could complement each other nicely in the workplace, however, when put to the test, their working relationship can prove to be very difficult. Both types agree on how good it feels to work alone and how frustrating it is to be micromanaged. However, INFPs are more creative and dare to think outside the box, while ISTJs like to find one way that works for them and then stick to it faithfully. INFPs can help ISTJs be more considerate of the ideas and feelings of others when making decisions, while ISTJs can help INFPs strengthen their logical problem-solving and follow-through on their plans.

INFP and ISFJ

These two types fall in the “yellow zone” of the compatibility chart. They have some similarities in their characters, but problems may occur if they don’t balance each other out, or if they decide to ignore potential issues.

Relationship

INFPs and ISFJs are quite similar to one another. ISFJs value family and long-term romantic commitment, and as sensitive empaths themselves, they understand how to relate to an INFP’s emotion and vulnerability. This can establish a strong emotional connection between these two, and their shared introversion will allow for many activities they could enjoy together. However, ISFJs are more down-to-earth, while INFPs are dreamers. This can cause frustration when the ISFJ partner is left to deal with the practicalities of their shared life. Also, both types avoid conflict, which makes it difficult for both sides to address their issues – or to leave a relationship that no longer works.

Friendship

INFPs and ISFJs are likely to get along better as friends rather than romantic partners. With their mutual Feeling preference, they are very accommodating to other people’s feelings — including each other’s. They are likely to appreciate quiet and reserved time due to their shared Introversion preference, which means they won’t force each other to spend time socializing. Both these personality types are good at bringing people together and finding a way to compromise when conflict arises, which makes it easy for them to understand one another on a deeper level. They are also willing to give the other person as much alone time as they need, without having to ponder much on why they require it in order to function properly.

At Work

INFPs and ISFJs both want their workplace to be in tune with their values; they both hope their careers will give them an opportunity to serve society as a whole. For ISFJs, this translates into conventional careers, where they have hands-on attention to detail, while INFPs are happiest when their job aligns with their sense of moral justice. They are likely to seek out projects which can significantly impact the world they live in for the better. Both types dislike conflict and stress and will do their best to avoid them. Even so, ISFJs may get frustrated with the more carefree and flexible approach that INFPs have, as well as their unwillingness to stick to a structure.

INFP and ESTP

These two personality types fall in the “red zone” of the compatibility chart. They don’t have much in common and their widely contrasting views on life can cause friction between them.

Relationship

INFPs and ESTPs are an unlikely romantic couple. Even though both personality types share a relaxed and easygoing attitude (partly due to their shared Perceiving preference), ESTPs aren’t as emotionally intense as INFPs. These types don’t rush into commitment, but for entirely different reasons: INFPs want to find their soulmate, while ESTPs are scared of being stuck in a boring relationship. Given their differing Introversion/Extroversion preference, their energy levels are also contrasting, which can be the cause of future drama and deep conversations that ESTP tend to avoid having. This is why it’s easy for INFPs to perceive ESTPs as shallow or disingenuine – a definite deal-breaker for the Mediator personality type.

Friendship

INFPs and ESTPs also make for curious friends, as these two types will hardly ever meet and interact in real life. This is because of how strikingly different they are from each other. INFPs are shy and like to keep to themselves, while ESTPs are always in the eye of the storm. You can see how these two personality types inhabit entirely different habitats. However, if they do bump into each other, both parties have a lot to learn from the other. ESTPs can push INFPs to broaden their horizons and leave their comfort zone, while INFPs can offer a deeper insight into understanding and dealing with emotion.

At Work

INFPs and ESTPs have very different working styles as well. INFPs pay more attention to their relationship with people and practice more compassion, whereas ESTPs are grounded and practical, taking the sensible approach when it comes to decision making. Even if ESTPs may appear insensitive to some, their charisma and pragmatism will reel people in nevertheless. INFPs can learn how to be more assertive from their ESTP colleagues, and ESTPs can improve their consideration of other perspectives with the help of INFPs.

INFP and ESFP

These two types fall in the “yellow zone” of the compatibility chart. They have some similarities in their characters, but problems may occur if they don’t balance each other out or if they decide to ignore potential issues.

Relationship

The INFP and ESFP romantic relationship has great potential to be well-balanced, bringing benefits to both sides. Even if the two personalities have many differences, ESFPs are adept at meeting the emotional needs of others, which is exactly what INFPs need. They also aren’t controlling – a trait that their INFP partner can further appreciate. Thanks to their shared Perceiving preference, both types enjoy flexibility and aren’t deeply rooted in structure. However, conflict may arise between these two when their Introversion/Extroversion is concerned. If pushed too far towards the INFP’s love for solitude, ESTPs may feel drained and bored. On the other hand, if INFPs are pushed too far to socialize, they can feel exhausted and bored as well. Both parties need to respect the preferences of the other and understand when to stop insisting on their own way of doing things.

Friendship

A friendship between an INFP and an ESFP can be a fun endeavor. As Feeling types, it’s easier for these two to recognize and validate each other’s emotions. ESFPs can help INFPs peek outside of their shells and venture into the external world, where the Sensing ESFP can introduce them to plenty of new sounds, sights, and experiences that can enrich their imaginations. On the other hand, INFPs can teach ESFPs how to look deeper within themselves and align with their inner values, passions, and feelings. As a result, the ESFP may contemplate future possibilities for a change instead of remaining preoccupied with the present. Both types are united by their laid-back approach to life and their tendency to listen to their own reasoning when making decisions.

At Work

INFPs and ESFPs have a lot of uniting similarities in the workplace as well. They are both approachable and compassionate to their coworkers, and as they sincerely care about the well-being of everyone they work with, both types will try their best to create a pleasant work environment. When working as a team, INFPs and ESFPs can complement each other. INFPs are more future-oriented, considering possibilities and innovative ideas, while ESFPs are present-focused, looking for sensible and pragmatic solutions.

INFP and ISTP

These two types fall in the “yellow zone” of the compatibility chart. They have some similarities in their characters, but problems may occur if they don’t balance each other out or if they decide to ignore potential issues.

Relationship

Even though they share no cognitive functions, INFPs and ISTPs are united by their shared introversion, which can lead to a deeper understanding and acceptance of the other’s social needs. They don’t have problems spending time on their own and letting the other person do the same, giving each other freedom to explore whatever they find individually interesting. The difference in their communication styles is where problems may arise. Given how non-emotionally expressive ISTPs are, they can’t meet the INFP’s need to receive constant reassurance of their partner’s commitment and deep feelings. The intensity of emotion that INFPs often bring to the table might be too much for the more pragmatic and matter-of-fact ISTP.

Friendship

INFPs and ISTPs can be drawn to each other as friends because of their similar energy levels (due to their shared Introversion preference) and flexible approach to life (due to their shared Perceiving preference). Given their differences, there is plenty they can learn from one another. The firmly-grounded ISTP can allow their INFP friend to open their mind to new perspectives and possibilities. They can get the feeling of expansion and grandeur when they talk to their Intuitive INFP friend. In return, the idealistic INFP can admire the realism, independence, and practicality of their ISTP friends that they themselves lack.

At Work

When it comes to work, both INFPs and ISTPs prefer improvising and keeping their options open, rather than planning carefully ahead. ISTPs take on a practical approach with their work, preferring to solve problems the rational way. INFPs, on the other hand, like to express themselves emotionally and listen to their inner intuition or instinct. When working with ISTPs, INFPs should try to be open to other perspectives and work on tuning down their emotional intensity, while trusting ISTPs to deal with issues in their own unique way.

INFP and ISFP

These two types fall in the “green zone” of the compatibility chart. They have quite a lot of similarities with each other, but at the same time possess enough differences to be able to learn from one another.

Relationship

INFPs and ISFPs can make an excellent match. Both types are gentle and non-imposing and appreciate similar behavior in return. Both INFPs and ISFPs put their partner’s feelings and needs above their own and share similar relationship expectations and life philosophies. They both value their freedom greatly, which means that they are unlikely to try to limit or control one another. Even if they seem like the perfect couple, however, conflict still may arise between them. INFPs are more future-oriented than the here-and-now focused ISFPs, which can make it hard for each to relate to the other. Additionally, both types’ dislike for conflict can lead to tension, as they often aren’t willing to talk openly about issues in the relationship.

Friendship

A friendship between INFP and ISFP is mostly easy. This is not surprising, given that these two types have three shared preferences. Even so, they can learn a lot from their differences, especially in their Sensing/Intuition contrast. The daydreaming, future-oriented INFPs are the “idea generators”, while the make-it-happen ISFPs are pragmatic and set in reality. Both types value their freedom and have a heightened sense of ideals, which is why they can easily appreciate these traits in each other. Both types also value the Introverted Feeling cognitive function, which is why their decision-making often aligns. However, since both MBTI types are stubbornly loyal to their values, heated arguments can arise if the two sides have vastly differing opinions.

At Work

INFPs and ISFPs bring their signature compassion and empathy everywhere, and the workplace is no exception. This is why it’s so easy for both of them to connect to their colleagues, as well as each other. They are also skillful at adapting quickly to changes and are flexible when it comes to their work process. INFPs are more proficient at offering innovative, out-of-the-box solutions to problems, whereas ISFPs have a better eye for detail. If these two work together, they can compliment their individual weaknesses in a productive way, while still managing to keep their relationship harmonious on a personal level.

INFP and ENTJ

These two types fall in the “yellow zone” of the compatibility chart. They have some similarities in their characters, but problems may occur if they don’t balance each other out or if they decide to ignore potential issues.

Relationship

The combination of INFP and ENTJ can be great for a romantic relationship – if both partners are willing to put in some effort. This pairing is united by their mutual love for discussion and intellectual stimulation. ENTJs aren’t much invested in traditions and enjoy new perspectives, which is why they could feel drawn to the INFP’s imagination. In fact, ENTJs are quite imaginative themselves, which in turn is a big plus for INFPs. Problems in this pairing can arise mainly from differences in their Thinking vs Feeling preferences. The INFP’s sensitivity to seemingly small issues can irritate ENTJs and make them feel as if they have to walk on eggshells. This is why these two need to take the time to understand each other’s needs and differing preferences.

Friendship

An INFP and ENTJ friendship can be both challenging and satisfying for both MBTI types. They have plenty of shared characteristics – curiosity, imagination, and future orientation. However, the INFP is a textbook idealist who lets their values dictate their decisions, whereas ENTJs are more interested in strategizing and achieving their goals with action. One can put it this way – INFPs strive to explore, while ENTJs seek to accomplish. This differing life philosophy can put this pair in a lot of arguments, which can be productive if both sides are open to receiving the other’s point of view.

At Work

INFPs and ENTJs seem to get along at work as well. They are both creative problem solvers who rely on their intuition to tell them what their next move should be. INFPs bring more empathy, understanding, and flexibility to the work environment, whereas ENTJs are more dependent on their logical thinking and practical, goal-oriented planning. Since these types contrast each other so highly, they can learn a lot from each other in a working relationship. INFPs can help soften ENTJs and help them consider emotion when making a decision. In return, ENTJs can steer INFPs towards following through on their goals.

INFP and ENTP

These two types fall in the “green zone” of the compatibility chart. They have quite a lot of similarities with each other, but at the same time possess enough differences to be able to learn from one another.

Relationship

Even if they seem vastly different from each other at a first glance, INFPs and ENTPs are surprisingly similar. They both like to broaden their horizons, given their adaptable and nonconformist nature. Even though they direct their energy differently (Extroversion vs Introversion), this shouldn’t be an issue as ENTPs are the most introverted of the extroverted MBTI types. The most likely area of conflict for these partners is communication – while ENTPs are blunt and straightforward, INFPs are more sensitive and take a lot of remarks personally. This can lead to ENTPs dismissing INFPs as too moody and the latter thinking that ENTPs are too insensitive and harsh.

Friendship

ENTPs and INFPs are united by a shared imagination and hunger for new ideas. They can make good friends, as both sides bring something different to the relationship. For INFPs this is idealism, depth, and unmatched warmth, while ENTPs bring charisma, energy, and precision. These two can connect over each other’s curious ideas and can spend countless hours speculating about the unknown. However, they may clash over their Feeling vs Thinking preferences. ENTPs are rooted in logic and facts, while INFPs look more to their emotions and moral values. This difference could cause heated discussions between the two – but it’s nothing they can’t handle.

At Work

As curious and imaginative personalities, INFPs and ENTPs make for excellent idea generators at work. They can make a powerful team when it comes to discussing and brainstorming, as neither will shy away from questioning the other’s position if they don’t agree with it. This work pairing is likely to bring plenty of creative and innovative solutions to workplace problems. When they have to make a decision together, INFPs will bring empathetic reasoning, while ENTPs will lean on logical thinking instead. As they complement each other in such a good way, there is little that these two can’t accomplish together.

INFP and INTJ

These two types fall in the “green zone” of the compatibility chart. They have quite a lot of similarities with each other, but at the same time possess enough differences to be able to learn from one another.

Relationship

Even if the INFPs and INTJs may seem worlds apart from each other, they have plenty of potential to form an ideal relationship because of their intellectual compatibility. They are likely to keep each other interested in conversation because of their orientation toward the future, as well as their vivid imaginations. Introversion is another thing that unites them and guarantees they won’t pressure each other to participate in social events. However, INTJs’ preference for order and cleanliness is not likely to sit well with the more easy-going INFPs.

Friendship

As friends, an INFP and INTJ are also connected through mutual vision and depth. Both are respectful of the other’s need for privacy and space, yet they push each other to be better people. INTJs can help INFPs with finding a strategy for achieving their goals and staying focused, while in return INFPs teach INTJs how to tap into their inner desires, passions, and ideals. The intellectual connection between the two brings them closer through intriguing discussions. This dynamic duo can get into arguments because of their differing decision-making styles – INTJs have a more impersonal and objective approach, while INFPs rely on a personal and empathetic one.

At Work

INTJs and INFPs are both intuitive and introverted types who are good at creative thought and like to spend time alone. When it comes to work, INTJs rely on logical thinking and organization, whereas INFPs are more adaptable, emotional thinkers. In true introvert fashion, INTJs prefer to work independently and don’t need others as a source of motivation or inspiration. In contrast, INFPs are team players and enjoy forming connections with others. Even if they still need to be alone from time to time, they are more conscientious and open-minded than their INTJ colleagues.

INFP and INTP

These two types fall in the “blue zone” of the compatibility chart. They share nearly identical world views, values, interests, and life philosophies. Thus, they can relate well to each other.

Relationship

As Myers-Briggs personalities who share 3 of 4 preferences, INFPs and INTPs have plenty in common. Neither has the desire to control the other since they both value their freedom as Perceiving types. They enjoy intellectual activities, passing time by reading or speculating about complicated subjects. As introverts, both immerse themselves in quietness and value their privacy, which puts them on the same page about what a good time looks like. The problems in their relationship may crop up because of the INTP’s logical and seemingly insensitive nature. They are likely to question the INFP’s focus on emotion and stay ignorant about their own feelings, which is an attitude that can only frustrate an INFP.

Friendship

A friendship between INFP and INTP is likely to be comfortable, warm, and fueled by compassion and support. Since both types are on quests for freedom and personal growth, they are likely to build each other up while still giving one another healthy space. They are both driven by imagination and abstract concepts, so they will never lack interesting topics to discuss with one another. Both types are individualistic, yet they both hold tightly to their own values and principles. The difference in communication styles is where this friendship will likely be tested – INFPs may seem too sensitive or emotional for the detached and rational INTPs.

At Work

In the workplace, INFPs and INTPs are united by their mutual love for privacy and discussing innovative solutions to problems. Like two jigsaw pieces that fit together, the strengths and weaknesses of these two complements each other nicely. INTPs bring logical reasoning to the table, while INFPs offer more people-oriented reasoning in return. INTPs, as the Thinking types, can help the more sensitive INFP to think more critically about difficult issues or situations. On the contrary, empathetic INFPs can teach INTPs how to recognize the personal and emotional impact their decisions have on others.

INFP and ENFJ

These two types fall in the “green zone” of the compatibility chart. They have quite a lot of similarities with each other, but at the same time possess enough differences to be able to learn from one another.

Relationship

The INFP-ENFJ couple has a great potential for a balanced and harmonious relationship. Both types are very focused on their relationships and prioritize them when it comes to work-life balance. Both are warm individuals who are authentic to their core; they don’t appreciate it when others pretend to be something they’re not. They seek deeper connections and are very open with their partners, willing to discuss anything. The main possibility for tension in this pairing is that the ENFJ’s energy can become too much to handle for the introverted INFP. Despite this, however, this relationship is most likely to be balanced and strong, built on mutual compassion, understanding, and comfort.

Friendship

INFPs and ENFJs build their friendships on the foundation of vision and passion. The INFP friend is likely to challenge an ENFJ to look inside themselves and find out what is truly important to them. The ENFJ friend in return challenges INFPs to pursue their dreams, to be more social, and to express themselves more often. Since both types are emotionally warm, empathetic, and supportive, they are likely to be able to approach each other in the right way. This friendship is typically fruitful, as each type finds the other inspirational and motivating.

At Work

The often effortless cooperation between INFPs and ENFJs shines in the workplace as well. Both types like coming up with creative solutions to problems and consistently show their coworkers empathy. However, where INFPs are better at using a quiet and flexible approach, ENFJs provide plenty of charisma to go around. INFPs can teach ENFJs how to take more quality time for themselves and how to enjoy a slower pace of living, whereas ENFJs can teach INFPs how to communicate more openly without fear. These two types are able to appreciate the boundaries of the other, which is why they often make for stellar work partners.

INFP and INFP

These two types fall in the “blue zone” of the compatibility chart. Since they share nearly identical world views, values, interests, and life philosophies, they can relate well to each other.

Relationship

An INFP relationship with another INFP can be very satisfying for all involved. These two get along with almost no effort – after all, they share values, feelings, and attitudes towards life, as well as a great emotional connection. They are interested in the same activities and intuitively understand the complex emotions that their partner expresses. However, these two don’t only share strengths but weaknesses as well. They are both painfully sensitive to criticism, and their pursuit of freedom can end up looking like a lack of organizational skills. For example, both INFPs might tend to be messy, and money handling isn’t their forte. This can cause problems, as neither side will want to take initiative and deal with these things. Furthermore, INFPs avoid confrontation at all costs – which makes it difficult to resolve disagreements.

Friendship

It’s only natural that INFPs get along well with their INFP friends. They share a similar thirst for creative endeavors and innovation, are imaginative, sincere, and empathetic. Both have firm values and beliefs, which they are ready to stand up for above everything else. As much as this brings them close together, it can also cause them to draw away from each other. Since INFPs are individualistic and are strongly guided by their beliefs, they won’t hesitate to argue about what is “wrong” and what is “right.” Even so, INFPs are drawn to their own type because of the feeling of “kindred spirits” that they perceive, which can form a strong and instant connection.

At Work

When working together, INFPs bring a lot of creativity, innovation, and out-of-the-box thinking to the workplace. As they are both empathetic, compassionate, and diplomatic, it is easy for them to find common ground with each other, as well as with the rest of their coworkers. It is important that INFP colleagues listen to and encourage each other, which can help them feel a sense of acceptance in their work environment.

INFP and ENFP

These two types fall in the “blue zone” of the compatibility chart. They share nearly identical world views, values, interests, and life philosophies. They can also relate well to each other.

Relationship

INFPs and ENFPs share the same cognitive functions but prioritize them differently. This makes it easier for them to understand each other and allows for a strong bond in a romantic relationship between them. These types typically feel a heightened sense of comfort around each other, and their shared empathy makes it easy to open up to each other. An interesting problem that can occur in this pairing is a sense of competitiveness between these two types – both want to be the more passionate and/or creative ones in the relationship.

Friendship

INFPs and ENFPs seem to have an almost spiritual bond in their friendship. Communication between them flows effortlessly, and they share similar values, worldviews, and senses of humor. From a more technical MBTI perspective, since they complement each other’s dominant and auxiliary functions, the bond they share is very balanced and works well for both sides. Given their shared functions, they see the world in a very similar way and can find much comfort in each other’s way of thinking. Their natural connection often makes it easy for one to put themselves in the position of the other and see where they are coming from. Overall, this friendship is likely to be harmonious and nurturing, for both sides.

At Work

Both personality types share a lot of common characteristics – they are caring, creative, and adaptable. However, one can see significant differences between them as well. While an ENFP is a social and inviting colleague always eager to work in a team, the INFP person prefers solitude and independence. This can cause some friction between the two MBTI types, as ENFPs often have trouble understanding how introversion works. However, as these types complement each other well, they are likely to make a good team – with INFPs teaching ENFPs how to be better at listening and ENFPs showing them how to be more direct in their expression.

INFP and INFJ

These two types fall in the “blue zone” of the compatibility chart. They share nearly identical world views, values, interests, and life philosophies. They can also relate well to each other.

Relationship

Even though INFJs and INFPs don’t share any cognitive functions, they do have three shared preferences. This often leads to them having common values and an overall agreeability. It’s not unusual for this pairing to find deep understanding and comfort in their partner. Overall the relationship has a great potential for establishing a close and caring connection. Even though INFJs and INFPs can sometimes disagree on some topics, it’s likely that they think the same way about the important things in life. Their differences can be a good thing since this allows them an opportunity to grow and learn from each other.

Friendship

INFJs and INFPs get along with one another without many words necessary; their many similarities allow communication to flow effortlessly between them. Their strong, shared intuition can further bring them together, allowing for an unspoken understanding between the two types. Because of their natural connection, it’s easy for each friend to see the world from the perspective of the other. All in all, this is likely to be a friendship mostly free of stress and conflict, in which both the INFJ and INFP will feel comfortable.

At Work

INFJs and INFPs are often compatible when it comes to working as well. They are able to bring creative and uncommon solutions when a problem arises and practice a strong sense of empathy in the workplace. It’s easy for them to cooperate and communicate with others, given their pacifistic natures. They prefer that their work involves patterns and concepts, rather than an emphasis on details. INFPs bring a flexible attitude to the workplace and can sometimes rebel against strict rules, while INFJs are more committed and dedicated, despite any regulations.