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ENFJ Relationships with other MBTI Types

The ENFJ personality type stands out for its giving nature, loyalty, and respect in relationships. Their top priority is to manifest meaningful connections with others. While that comes easy for an ENFJ, not everyone they meet will be as friendly, or even interested in forming such relationships. In this article, we’ll focus on explaining the compatibility of the ENFJ personality type with all other MBTI types. By the end of this article you will be able to answer the following questions:

  • Who are ENFJs compatible with?
  • What are ENFJs like in a relationship?
  • Which personality type are ENFJs best friends with?
  • Which MBTI type do ENFJs get along with at work?
Not sure what your Myers-Briggs personality type is? You can easily find out by taking our comprehensive personality test.

ENFJ Relationships and Dating

ENFJs are natural givers in all their relationships. They enjoy helping others reach their personal potential and, as excellent listeners and the bubbly outgoing type, they make for extremely desirable partners. ENFJs also enjoy being in romantic relationships, as they feel most empowered when being part of a team.

ENFJ Dating

Putting their relationships on a pedestal, this personality type doesn’t enjoy being single for too long and usually isn’t interested in one-time flings. ENFJs can be a little picky when choosing a partner (okay, they can be very picky). This has a lot to do with their Introverted Intuition function. Having Intuitive Intuition as their аuxiliary function, this personality type focuses on the future outcomes in most aspects of their lives. In the case of their romantic relationships, they want to find a suitable long-term partner, rather than someone casual who can’t commit.

ENFJ Best Match

It is worth noting that any pair of mature adults should be able to get along, so long as they put work into their relationship. The ENFJ personality type matches well with a partner whose dominant function is Introverted Feeling, like an INFP or ISFP, because they share the same Intuitive view of the world. Other good examples of lasting relationships can be found with INFPs and INFJs.

ENFJ Compatibility

Being the outgoing powerhouses they are, ENFJs can be a suitable fit for many of the personality types. Of course, some Myers-Briggs types may view them as too clingy or loud, and this is usually the case with the Sensors of the 16 Personalities. Typically, ENFJs should look for someone with a dominant Intuitive function if they are striving for compatibility. This way they can share the same views of the world, without being exhausted by an overly pedantic and logical partner.

ENFJ Compatibility Chart

The following chart can give a visual explanation of the compatibility between all 16 types with regards to ENFJs specifically, divided into four categories by temperament:

Blue – Types that share similar values, interests, and philosophies with the ENFJ type.
Green – Types that can be in a harmonious relationship with ENFJs and their thought-provoking differences can help them mature in their relationships.
Yellow – Types that are somewhat similar to ENFJs, but compromise and effort will be required to maintain a happy relationship.
Red – Types that are extremely different from ENFJs and will require a lot of work and patience to produce a coherent and healthy relationship.

ENFJ Compatibility Chart

ENFJ and ESTJ

The combination between ENFJ and ESTJ at first glance may seem logical, but being in the “red” zone of the chart, they might have to rethink this match!

Relationship 

In a relationship these two personalities may clash frequently, they have similar views and understandings of the world, but their approaches to resolving issues are completely different. Even though there are some underlined similarities, like the fact that they are both Extroverted, it is also where their similarities end. ESTJs tend to be more controlling as people, with a tendency towards pragmatism and facts. They live in a concrete world, in the here and now, so having a partner constantly worried about the future, like an ENFJ, can be exhausting for them.

Friendship

Another instance where these two types would clash is in their approach toward friendships and how they deal with other people’s problems and feelings. The ENFJ is “The Guide” of the 16 personalities, while the ESTJ is “The Administrator.” Both can be great at offering their help to their friends in tough situations. However, the two approach problems very differently. An ENFJ would tap into their emotional sensitivity to gain an understanding of the problem and give their full support, while ESTJs would be very concrete on how to deal with the issue. A common problem is that the limited way ESTJs express their feelings comes across as blunt and insensitive to their ENFJ buddies – and friends in general.

At Work

ESTJs are very hardworking, organized, and driven to fulfill their duties. They have an almost military approach when it comes to dealing with a task. As potential bosses and managers, this can put their ENFJ staff under a lot of pressure. ESTJs are likely to separate emotions and work, so they may seem a little insensitive to ENFJs. The freedom-loving ENFJ may also feel pressured to work under the strict 9-5 schedule of the ESTJ. All in all, if these two types find a middle ground and the proper way of communication, their opposing characteristics can teach them important lessons. The ESTJ can learn flexibility, while the ENFJ can learn different tips and tricks on how to maintain focus and structure in the workplace.

ENFJ and ESFJ

These two types fall in the “blue zone” of the compatibility chart. They share nearly identical world views, values, interests, and life philosophies. They can also relate well to each other.

Relationship

ENFJs and ESFJs share some of the most positive qualities – they are warm, friendly, and focused on others. They’re excellent at expressing their feelings and have no trouble supporting their family and friends. They are also both great at organizing their money and time, and they can be superb examples for those around them. One thing they need to look out for is the turn to avoidance when problems do arise, as both tend to stay away from serious conversations. They’d prefer it if every aspect of their lives were harmonious and peaceful. Of course, life can’t always be that way, and these types need to learn how to express their negative feelings without hurting one another.

Friendship

ENFJs and ESFJs love planning – that’s why it’s highly likely these two would enjoy planning trips together and going on multiple adventures. They’d know the details of their trip, they would have previously marked all locations they want to visit, including the exact routes they would take. It’s great, isn’t it? Sure, until they don’t experience anything outside of their comfort zone and they get drained by trying to stay on top of their own schedule. The ENFJESFJ friendship sometimes needs to let go of control, and let life happen the way it should – with all its surprises and unexpected delights!

At Work

Both of these personality types are very practical and organized at work – and they care deeply for the well-being of their colleagues. Due to their responsible and empathetic approach, they can make outstanding leaders. It’s probably not best to always let these two work together though, as some issues may arise. For instance, both the ESFJ and ENFJ would think a problem at work needs to be handled their way, and a conflict could arise. It is best to let them take turns of who has control in order to avoid such situations.

ENFJ and ISTJ

The combination between ENFJ and ISTJ at first glance may seem logical, but being in the “red” zone of the chart, they might want to rethink this match!

Relationship

These two types are extremely different – ENFJs are fun, outgoing, spontaneous, and deeply invested in feelings, while ISTJs are more practical, down-to-earth, logical, and constructive in their ways. Even though both parties would appreciate each other’s opposing traits, they might feel a sense of disconnect in a romantic relationship. An ISTJs constant desire to be right can quickly become frustrating to an ENFJ. Likewise, an ENFJ’s happy-go-lucky attitude towards life can be chaotic and easily misunderstood. These types need to be constantly switched on about their vast differences in order to maintain a happy relationship.

Friendship

ENFJs and ISTJs are unlikely to easily form bonds of friendship. They’re just too different. ENFJs will probably find ISTJs to be stuck-up and arrogant. As a non-confrontational type, ENFJs may also experience ISTJs’ attention to detail as overly pedantic, and immediately cross them off their friendship list. In a similar fashion, ISTJs are likely to think that ENFJs are a waste of their time, offering nothing to stimulate their logical and sequential brains. Of course, if these two types overlook the superficial differences and focus on making compromises about the way they see the world, they can make very interesting friends!

At Work

It is improbable that ENFJs and ISTJs would work together. ISTJs are drawn to very practical professions – think doctor, lawyer, or judge. ENFJs, on the other hand, are led to more philosophical endeavors – such as artistry, writing, and therapy. Their paths are unlikely to cross because their principle outlooks on the “ideal” profession are just too different. This speaks a lot about how opposing these types can be in the context of their professions. ISTJs don’t mind a job where the executive decisions would fall under their control, while ENFJs tend to stay away from huge responsibilities, as they would likely panic and blame themselves if they chose poorly.

ENFJ and ISFJ

The combination between ENFJ and ISFJ at first glance may seem logical, but being in the “red” zone of the chart, they might want to rethink this match!

Relationship

They say opposites attract – well, that’s rarely the case with ENFJs and ISFJs. ISFJs are the “here and now” sort of people, while ENFJs have a tendency to look towards the future. ISFJs are practical Sensors with realistic views, while ENFJs are fun and spontaneous. ISFJs dislike change, while for the flexible ENFJ it brings unpredictability and challenge. These two types could learn a lot from each other if they were to attempt a romantic relationship. But chances are the ISFJ’s very routined approach to life may clash with the ENFJ’s desire for unpredictability. ISFJs are quiet, personal and maybe even a little reserved, so an ENFJ’s bold and extroverted needs can be exhausting to keep up with.

Friendship

In social situations, ISFJs would probably be relieved to have an ENFJ around, to handle all the small talk. In reality, though, ISFJs might feel like they’re pressured to do adventurous things when hanging out with an ENFJ, which they’re not really interested in. They prefer to be left alone most of the time, and huge social gatherings can be draining for them. ISFJs recharge through “me time.” This could make ENFJs feel like they’re not being included in something, or that ISFJs are being too secretive, and the extroverted type could take it personally.

At Work

As dedicated professionals with a keen eye for detail, ISFJs are dependable and hard-working. They are focused on their ultimate goals and have excellent time-management skills. They enjoy working alone without any distractions. ISFJs are responsible and they can handle high-pressure jobs with composure. They can excel as doctors, police officers, or scientists. Chances are ENFJs and ISFJs never actually cross their professional paths. They simply look for opposite things when embarking on their personal careers.

ENFJ and ESTP

Highlighted with “yellow” on the compatibility chart, these two types share similar views about the world, but their differences may push them off balance. Some work is needed to harmonize the relationship.

Relationship

ENFJs and ESTPs are both fun-loving and generous, and they have the potential to be great partners. It is highly likely they will lead very fast-paced lives if they decide to be together, especially the ESTP. Sometimes, due to the nature of an ESTP’s profession (which is often highly demanding), an ENFJ might feel starved for attention, and they’d miss their partner in crime. ENFJs need to be careful not to demand too much of ESTPs – they already have a lot going on in their heads, and having someone by their side constantly seeking attention can have a negative effect on their relationship.

Friendship

ENFJs and ESTPs are very active personalities, but ESTPs have some trouble sticking to a commitment, whether it’s a coffee date or a brunch on a weekend, which can be a little difficult. They can be somewhat flakey because they like to keep their options open out of fear of boredom, and they often ask themselves the question “What if something better comes along?” Needless to say, this can upset an ENFJ and leave them feeling unappreciated, so ESTPs should try and be more assertive in such situations, in order to avoid hurting their friend.

At Work

ESTPs are natural salespeople, and their power of persuasion can be very impressive to an ENFJ. These two would work very well together, exchanging ideas and tactics on how to best make a sale. The ENFJ would probably prepare a detailed analysis on the methods of psychological influence which the ESTP would be honored to read, having clearly made such a positive impression on a colleague.

ENFJ and ESFP

Highlighted under the “yellow” zone on the compatibility chart, these two types share similar views about the world, but their differences may push them off balance. Some work is needed to harmonize the relationship.

Relationship 

ENFJs and ESFPs are both sociable, cooperative, and creative, and in a romantic relationship, an ENFJ would be swooning over the ESFP’s dazzling personality. ENFJs can be great supporters for ESFPs professionally, and because of that, they might have a hard time maintaining a work-life balance. ESFPs are natural performers and entertainers, so having an ENFJ by their side could be a real kickstart to their careers. ENFJs would be inspired to manage and guide their romantic partners. Of course, there could be a lot of pressure on both, as this would be a complex relationship, so it’s recommended they try to be more thick-skinned in problematic situations.

Friendship

It is likely this will be a very powerful friendship, as both of these types are action-loving and down-to-earth. Even though they have different primary cognitive functions, they fully understand that their differences make them unique and their friendship special. They wouldn’t have much trouble resolving their issues, as they both have an honest and practical approach to problem-solving.

At Work

ENFJs have a great sense of what is coming because they allow their intuition to guide them, while ESFPs live in the present. This could be very handy because they can help each other and fill in any gaps in their professional knowledge. In a similar fashion, ENFJs can teach organization and structure to ESFPs. All in all, this is a great fit for both!

ENFJ and ISTP

The combination between ENFJ and ISTP at first glance may seem logical, but being in the “red” zone of the chart, they might want to rethink this match!

Relationship

ENFJs and ISTPs make for a difficult romantic relationship. Yes, these types are both nuanced and complicated with an affinity for art. However, they also have extremely varied ways of expressing themselves. ENFJs would probably feel emotionally drained by ISTPs, due to their developed self-reliance. ISTPs feel easily trapped by the presence of other people and they need their personal space. They want to focus on becoming proficient at their jobs and they know they need a lot of time and space for experiments. An ENFJ partner would just feel too clingy and childish to them because ENFJs crave attention in a relationship. They want to be heard and to spend time with a partner and feel like they are one half of a whole thing. There is some possibility that these two could make it work, but they would need to give each other a lot of space to be themselves.

Friendship

Even as friends things don’t seem too favorable for these types. ISTPs might feel like ENFJs are just agreeing to everything they say, and think they are being mocked or manipulated. Or worse – that they are in the presence of a bad company. They just wouldn’t understand that ENFJs are peoplepleasers, starving to experience new meaningful relationships. Not to mention that ISTPs believe that truth is born in dispute, so they wouldn’t have issues with confronting ENFJs about this sort of behavior. And of course, ENFJs would run as far as possible from any arguments or confrontation.

At Work

Even though they have similar touchpoints, the problems between these types in romantic and platonic relationships can also show up at work. ENFJs have an encouraging and empathetic approach in the workplace that is miles apart from the intellectual and calculated ways of the ISTP. That’s okay – they’re simply built for different professions. The world needs the sensitive guidance of an ENFJ just as much as the technical skills of the ISTP. There is, of course, great potential for mutual improvement if these types work together, where the extraverted ENFJ can teach sensitivity to the often sometimes cold ISTP, and an ISTP can teach the ENFJ some analytical skills they might lack.

ENFJ and ISFP

Highlighted under the “green” zone on the chart, this is considered the overall best match for the ENFJ personality type, offering a lot of potential for personal growth and inspiration in their relationship.

Relationship

The romantic relationship between an ENFJ and ISFP can be passionate, warm, and harmonious, and both types are likely to put a lot of effort into a longterm commitment. ISFPs are artistic and creative personalities that can provide just the right amount of spice into romance. The two make a great team in social situations as well, with the ENFJ taking care of the small talk (which isn’t particularly favored by the ISFP), while the ISFP listens. ISFPs are also very spontaneous and can surprise their ENFJ partners with impromptu short trips, as they dislike long-term planning and often leave it to the ENFJ to worry about.

Friendship

Both ISFPs and ENFJs are very quirky and nonjudgemental. Although ISFPs aren’t as approachable at first glance, ENFJs can easily break their barriers and make them feel appreciated and seen. They might even share views on matters of the heart, as they both have the same Feeling tendencies. It is probably rare that these two would have any arguments, as they despise conflict and generally fend off arguments pretty quickly.

At Work

ISFPs lean on their Sensor qualities when dealing with work, focusing on the practical side of their job. They also know how to think outside of the box and offer original solutions to problems. They are usually methodical about learning a new skill and can be perfectionists in very niche areas of their lives. While at work, it’s good for ISFPs to have an ENFJ around because ISFPs love receiving compliments and getting noticed by others. On the other hand, they also have a little something to teach ENFJs when it comes to the importance of details.

ENFJ and ENTJ

These two types fall under the “blue zone” of the compatibility chart. They share nearly identical world views, values, interests, and life philosophies. They can also relate well to each other.

Relationship

ENFJ and ENTJ can make a very interesting pairing, as both types have very similar ways of viewing the world. They are both kind and sensitive and they share each other’s best and worst qualities, which is where problems may arise. An ENFJ might unintentionally play the victim in an argument, while ENTJs can be too controlling, leading to an even bigger argument. They should focus on feeding off each other’s good sides in such situations, and try to communicate their feelings in an honest and direct manner.

Friendship

ENFJs and ENTJs are usually a pair of great friends, even though at times they can feel like they have different opinions on things. This shouldn’t prevent them from being friends, so long as ENFJs learn how to deal with criticism. ENFJs can also learn a lot about how to best express their feelings, so as to not look intimidating or impulsive. This can be a very fulfilling friendship if both types appreciate and move past their differences.

At Work

ENTJs and ENFJs might struggle little getting things done, as both types have a tendency to focus too much on the future, rather than what needs to be done in the present moment. They’d be great at brainstorming and cooking up ideas to complete a project, but they might get a little carried away theorizing. They should try and focus more on doing the actual job, rather than spending all their time developing ideas.

ENFJ and ENTP

Highlighted under the “yellow” zone on the compatibility chart, these two types share similar views about the world, but their differences may push them off balance. Some work is needed to harmonize the relationship.

Relationship

ENFJs and ENTPs definitely have some similarities as their strengths, but their differences are what can make or break the relationship. For one, ENTPs can get bored pretty easily being in a committed relationship, and the constant chase and energy thrown into entertaining the ENTP can exhaust ENFJs. ENTPs also tend to be argumentative, which is not something ENFJs can tolerate, so overall, these two types might seem like they have a lot in common on the outside, but in fact, it would take some amount of hard work to keep them together.

Friendship

ENTPs are intellectual and curious, which can very much appeal to ENFJs. They would feel like they are gaining a lot from such a relationship because they are constantly learning and, with that, growing. Personal growth is essential for ENFJs, but they should be careful not to smother their independent ENTPs with too much attention.

At Work

Work is the place where these two types have the chance to truly shine as a team – ENTPs devotion to teaching and ability to establish consistency with their colleagues is exactly the thing ENFJs are missing from their extensive list of skills. ENFJs already have a certain level of enthusiasm and order planted in their lives, but with the right approach from an ENTP, they can truly manifest what they want!

ENFJ and INTJ

These two types fall under the “blue zone” of the compatibility chart. They share nearly identical world views, values, interests, and life philosophies. They can also relate well to each other.

Relationship 

In a broad concept, these two can be very different – INTJs can harbor their feelings and be impersonal in relationships. Against all odds, however, ENFJs may be able to help these thick-skinned MBTI types to come out of their shell. Through sharing similar world views and the same grasp about their future, these types can be fundamentally good for each other. ENFJs know that the INTJ’s quiet and sometimes reserved nature has nothing to do with them being shy. Instead, they are very calculated and intelligent people, who would rather listen and observe. This can be a very beneficial relationship for both types.

Friendship

INTJs aren’t that good at making positive first impressions. Having an NT Intellectual temperament, these types are private strategists, which can come across as arrogance upon meeting them for the first time. This is especially true when they meet an extrovert, as these types have a tendency to dramatize their quiet personalities. If they give each other the chance, though, they can make the most interesting friendships, leaving them with plenty of space to philosophize about the world and how it works.

At Work

Speaking of work, that’s where INTJs are probably most intense. ENFJs and INTJs can make a good team because ENFJs can teach them how to let go of stress and insecurity. INTJs should benefit from learning that mistakes do happen, and it is okay, and who better to show them how than the tactful ENFJs? Alternatively, if these two roll up their sleeves, they can go through an immense amount of work in a short period of time, which can boost both of their self esteems.

ENFJ and INTP

Highlighted under the “yellow” zone on the compatibility chart, these two types share similar views about the world, but their differences may push them off balance. Some work is needed to harmonize the relationship.

Relationship

INTPs are very good at dealing with criticism, but they’re also blindly under the impression everyone else is too. That’s not the case with ENFJs though, and the potential for conflicts and friction between the two is high. One of INTP’s weaknesses is their, at times, explosive personality, which can be a serious letdown to ENFJs. They seek peace and harmony in a relationship and having a fiery partner can leave them withering. On the other hand, if both are willing to put in enough work, INTPs can learn how to better express and manage their feelings. Alternatively, ENFJs can learn to be more fearless and to stand up for themselves.

Friendship

INTPs value truth over tact and prefer to be given an honest opinion on matters. They might get irritated by an ENFJs sensitivity, thinking they’re being dramatic and overreacting. INTPs would most likely get tired of an ENFJs constant desire to go out and be sociable. Regardless of all their differences, these two personality types have the potential to learn a lot from each other. INTP’s more logistical approach to life can open up new doors for an ENFJs imagination, and together they can ponder and theorize about the essence of things.

At Work

At work, INTPs may have a problem with ENFJs’ tendency to believe in ambiguous data. INTPs don’t respect sloppy thinking and prefer to be much more thorough with incoming information. They are focused on technicalities and details and they like to work alone. They’re not too happy in a team because they would struggle to communicate their complex thoughts and ideas. INTPs need their profession to stimulate their intellectuality. ENFJs are quite the opposite as they feel their work should support society as opposed to themselves individually.

ENFJ and ENFJ

These two types fall under the “blue” category of the chart, identifying that they have similar world views and values.

Relationship

Based on mutual understanding, the ENFJENFJ relationship has a lot of potential. Both parties could feel like they have met their “soulmate” and that finally, someone understands how they feel. Even though it is considered a very harmonious relationship, this pairing may have a tendency to fall into a rut, with little space for self-development and personal growth. If they remain conscious of this tendency, however, the pair may find that they can push each other to be the best version of themselves.

Friendship

ENFJs are very fun to be around – they have a great sense of humor, and are dramatic, energetic, and optimistic life-lovers. They get along with everyone easily, so а friendship between two ENFJs can be very powerful. They can develop a great bond and they’re unlikely to get bored of one another, as they can always find new and exciting things to do together. One possible issue may be their tendency to give in easily into doing things they don’t actually want to do. While an ENFJ would simply feel they’re being polite by saying yes, by continuing down that path they can become pushovers. ENFJs should try to keep a sense of individuality if they spend a lot of time with another ENFJ type.

At Work

Having one ENFJ at work is a dream come true. Having two? Now that’s something really special! ENFJs’ ability to manage and schedule tasks, their natural flair for putting things in order, and their outside-the-box thinking can make them the ultimate team. It’s good to be an ENFJ and have another ENFJ as a colleague. These two can share tasks and probably do twice the job they normally would, completed in half the time. If they get stuck, they’d always have someone to turn to for help, and together they can collaboratively find the best solutions to any upcoming issues.

ENFJ and ENFP

These two types fall under the “blue” category of the chart, identifying that they have similar world views and values.

Relationship

ENFJ and ENFP and seem very much alike on the surface (notice how they share 3/4 preferences – Extroverted, Intuitive, and Feeling) and many of their friends would think they would make an excellent couple. Yes, both of these types are extraverted and they’ll probably thrive in social situations. Unfortunately, on a deeper level, these two can attempt to change one another, or they may both strive for dominance in the relationship, leading to deeper issues in the long term.

Friendship

Both ENFJs and ENFPs put a great amount of emphasis on their relationships. They tend to prioritize their friends over themselves. So if those two personality types were to find each other, they could have a very special bond, as they would feel understood on a deeper level. They would also have very similar interests – they might enjoy the same activities, TV shows, sports, and games, and they’d never get stuck thinking about the details of their next adventure. Overall, we could say this combination of personalities can make much more sense as friends, rather than as a romantic couple.

At Work

There is a good chance you’ll find ENFPs and ENFJs working together – they have very similar passions about career choices with a small difference that ENFPs are more prone to entrepreneurship than ENFJs. ENFPs can also tackle multiple tasks at once, but if they get stuck, which is normal, ENFJs would be a great person to have around – to show them how to manage their time better. ENFJs can teach a few organizational skills to a very sporadic ENFP, while ENFPs can quickly find artistic and creative solutions to any problems that an ENFP may have.

ENFJ and INFJ

Highlighted under the “green” zone on the chart, INFJ is considered to be the overall best match for the ENFJ personality type, offering a lot of potential for personal growth and inspiration in their relationship.

Relationship

ENFJs and INFJs share the same cognitive functionsNi, Fe, Ti, and Se. We have already discussed that ENFJs are most suited to be with someone who has a dominant Intuition, much like in the case with INFJ. INFJs are romantics, and they have very high standards when they look for a partner. They can’t be with just anyone, because true love is of the utmost value to them. They tend to look for “the one” and it might seem like they’re being too picky to those around them. ENFJs and INFJs can make an excellent couple because the INFJ would feel loved and appreciated for who they are. And vice versa – INFJs are called “The Confidants” of the 16 personalities because they are excellent listeners and they know how to make their partners feel appreciated and understood.

Friendship

It might seem like INFJs are incredibly hard to get to know, because they’re private and introspective and they don’t tend to hang out with lots of people. They also have secretive tendencies, so it is understandable how they are not everyone’s cup of tea. However, when they do let people in, they can build beautiful and strong connections. Even though INFJs and ENFJs have opposing dominant functions, it serves them well in perspective. They’re almost like pieces of a puzzle, even though they’re different, they somehow magically fit.

At Work

INFJs and ENFJs would make a great team. Both personality types prefer structured methods when working; they’re task-oriented and organized in their jobs. ENFJs can help INFJs come out of their comfort zone, so they can find new and refreshing ways to achieve their goals. Both types seek work that’s meaningful, which is also the reason why these types look for jobs in similar fields. They also share the NF Visionary temperament, making them highly idealistic in their goals.

ENFJ and INFP

Highlighted under the “green” zone on the chart, INFP is considered to be another overall best match for the ENFJ personality type, offering a lot of potential for personal growth and inspiration in their relationship.

Relationship

These two NF Visionary types are also highly compatible – with a shared longing for the future and a tendency for generously expressing affection toward others, these types can truly nurture one another. The primary Introverted Intuition in INFPs sparks a desire to connect with others on a very deep level. INFPs know their values – they want someone by their side who can enrich their lives for the better. ENFJs would be just the person to fit this description. Still, INFPs need to learn to appreciate people for who they are, rather than trying to change their partners into their personal ideals.

Friendship

INFPs make friends very easily, and even though they are mainly introverted, they still enjoy a bit of a party sometimes. They have found the best way to cope with too many people, and they’d rather let the extroverts do the talking. You’ll notice INFPs tend to hang out with one of the extroverted types, like an ENFJ or an ENFP. INFPs leave oversharing to their friends at first until the INFP can relax and build enough trust to be able to talk freely about their personal lives. These personalities can develop very strong and unbreakable relationships with one another, so the prospect of becoming BFFs (best friends forever) is high!

At Work

INFPs can be great at both, working individually, and in a group of people. Their usual preference is to work alone, but they find a lot of emotional satisfaction when being part of a collective. This is largely due to INFP’s tendency to react emotionally to criticism. They know that if they are alone, they can make as many mistakes as they want and they can fix them in their own time. Alternatively, at work INFPs can pair well with ENFJs, because they’ll be in the company of a natural teacher. INFPs can be guided and taught deadlines and this can help them stay on top of tasks. The added emotional intelligence of ENFJs can help teach INFPs that they can still progress without getting their feelings hurt.