Personality Max Logo
Home / Personality / ISFP / Relationships

ISFP Relationships with Other MBTI Types

Wouldn’t the world be a better place if we could all just get along? An optimistic idealist may react to this question with a wholehearted agreement, while a down-to-earth skeptic’s knee-jerk reaction may be to sneer at its naiveté. And this difference of opinion is one reason why the world coming together in Disneyland fashion and achieving complete harmony is easier said than done.

This, however, doesn’t mean that we can’t work towards solidarity! So how can our hypothetical idealist and skeptic selves get along better? The first step would be to accept and appreciate one another’s differing views. We all have a tendency to assume that others think and behave the same way we do. In social psychology, this is known as the ‘false consensus effect,’ and is one of the most prevalent and well-established cognitive biases.

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator is a great way to gain a better understanding of what makes us think and behave the way we do. As such, it can help us appreciate other points of view and achieve more harmony in our relationships.

Not sure about your Myers-Briggs type? Take our free personality test to find out!

In this article, we explore ISFP relationships in various contexts, such as work, love, and friendship. We look at the best matches for the ISFP among the other MBTI personality types, as well as the type’s characteristic way of behaving in love and dating. Also, we dive into the ISFP’s compatibility with each of the other personalities.

ISFP Relationships

As you probably know, ISFP stands for Introverted (I), Sensing (S), Feeling (F), and Perceiving (P). These are the ISFP preferences. Known as the Adventurer, people with this personality type are some of the most impulsive and thrill-seeking of all the MBTI types. However, they are also quiet and reserved, which can make them seem unpredictable. Their dominant function is Introverted Feeling, so they base their decisions on their principles they aren’t always comfortable sharing. But what can we expect from ISFPs in a relationship? Let’s explore by focusing on their defining personality traits.

ISFP types are often private and self-contained, so it may be hard to get to know them at first. They highly value their autonomy and may retreat from a relationship if they feel their independence threatened. Nevertheless, ISFPs are warm and kind-hearted, so they tend to be friendly and helpful with those around them, especially if they feel safe and appreciated.

ISFPs also value authenticity and always seek to express their genuine self, so honesty and integrity can be expected from them. They stand up for what they think is right and are loyal and devoted to those close to them. Their strive for a genuine connection with others makes them more likely to pursue long-term, committed relationships. But their attraction to novelty and dislike for routine may drive them to avoid relationships that they see as stagnating or predictable.

ISFP Love and Dating

In romantic relationships, ISFPs stand out with their caring and affectionate nature. They tend to be accommodating to their partner’s psychological needs, as they are attuned to the emotional context of a situation and seek to help others. Their sensitivity and observant nature also make them great listeners.

But there is a possible downside to ISFPs’ considerate character, which may be detrimental to both the ISFP person and their potential partner. The Adventurer may sometimes focus so much on taking care of their partner that they lose sight of their own needs. They also tend to be very sensitive to criticism while at the same time avoid confrontations, which makes it likely that they withdraw and become distant if they feel hurt by negative feedback.

ISFP Dating

ISFPs are quiet and reserved, so it is unlikely for them to make the first move. However, their search for novel experiences makes it very likely that they have plenty of opportunities to meet someone new. The Adventurer’s restrained demeanor lends this type a sort of mystery early on in a relationship. This could be alluring to their dates, but it may also leave them a bit confused if they are unable to decipher the ISFP’s feelings and intentions.

One thing to keep in mind when dating an Adventurer is that they use few words. ISFPs are action-oriented, so their partners should try to pay attention to the gestures and other unspoken signals through which they share their feelings. ISFPs also like to feel appreciated, so their partner would do good to acknowledge an Adventurer’s accommodating gestures.

ISFP Love

Once past the initial stages of a relationship, ISFPs tend to be loyal and committed. Their goal is to establish a genuine connection with someone, which enables open communication between the partners. However, ISFPs’ desire to maintain their autonomy and personal space can make them unrelenting if they see their partner as controlling or overbearing.

ISFPs tend to be very empathic partners – they want to make their significant other feel safe and appreciated. But they also expect the same from their partner and may be overly sensitive to perceived criticism or lack of recognition. This can cause problems in the long term, as ISFPs’ aversion to conflict and disagreement may result in the internalization of emotions instead of open sharing.

ISFP Best Match

Do opposites attract? Or do birds of a feather flock together? Well, a bit of both. Certain personality characteristics fit well when they are contrasting, as they complement each other and help both partners. But other characteristics don’t match up well if they are on the opposite sides of the spectrum, because they create too much friction or distance between the two sides. For instance, a more organized partner can help a more chaotic and spontaneous one get things done when needed. But if one partner is very much focused on interpreting the symbolic meaning of events, while the other is more focused on the facts as they are, their worldviews may be too differing for a genuine connection to occur naturally.

With that in mind, what is the ideal match for an ISFP? There are a couple of MBTI types that are a great fit for the Adventurer. Those are ESFPs, ISTPs, and ISFJs. These types are similar enough that they get along well with an ISFP partner, but also different enough that they provide an opportunity for both partners to grow and develop.

ISFP at Work

ISFPs are creative and spontaneous, so they enjoy work that allows them to express these qualities. They don’t like to be bogged down by rules and procedures but prefer to have the flexibility to determine their own path to completing an assignment. ISFPs may sometimes struggle with long-term planning as they prefer to focus on the present moment, so it may be a good idea for other team members to be in charge of this side of the projects.

ISFPs treasure their independence and may react negatively to being subjected to strict control. However, if they have enough space to approach a task in their own way, they can be counted on to get the job done.

ISFPs also prefer solitary work instead of one that calls for constant communication. Although they generally have good people skills, they may be quickly exhausted by jobs that require excessive socializing. ISFPs are also sensitive to criticism and like to feel appreciated when they have done a good job, so colleagues need to be careful when giving feedback, as well as recognize ISFPs’ achievements.

Curious about the best career matches for the Adventurer? Check out our ISFP careers article!

ISFP in Friendship

ISFPs are one of the most fun-loving and considerate personality types, so being friends with an Adventurer type ensures you’ll have a blast and be appreciated too. They may seem quiet at first, but behind the reserved demeanor lies a sensitive and adventurous soul. Once you get to know an ISFP, you’re bound to encounter a depth of feeling and experience that can enrich your life.

Another personality trait of ISFPs is their preference for action over words. They would rather spend time pursuing fun, casual activities than get into deep conversation, especially if the topic is abstract or intellectual. ISFPs are realistic and focus on the world they perceive through their senses, so sharing experiences is their way of connecting to others. As in other settings, perceived criticism or inconsiderate remarks can hurt them and make them retreat.

ISFP Compatibility

To give you a better idea of the ISFPs’ compatibility with every one of the 16 personality types (including themselves), we’ve created a chart summarizing the degree of like-mindedness with each type, divided by temperament group. Below is a color-coded guide. Keep in mind that this is meant as a rough outline of the potential for a connection between different types and should not be taken as a definitive guide. Any two types can get along well given enough mutual understanding and appreciation.

Blue – These types have very similar beliefs, attitudes, and interests to those of ISFPs
Green – These types have more than a few similarities with ISFPs, but also some notable distinctions that provide opportunities for mutual growth
Yellow – These types have some similarities with ISFPs, but also quite a few differences, so a healthy relationship between them may require some work
Red – These types have more differences than similarities with ISFPs and a relationship between them may require a lot of work

ISFP Compatibility Chart

ISFP and ESTJ

These two types are in the “red zone” of the compatibility chart. They differ greatly in their worldviews, which can cause clashes between them and require a lot of work to achieve a harmonious relationship.

Romantic Relationship

ISFPs and ESTJs have little in common, aside from their focus on concrete and down-to-earth attitudes. ESTJs are usually direct and can sometimes be seen as controlling. Both of these qualities can put off the sensitive and independent ISFP. The organized ESTJ, on the other hand, may find it hard to tolerate the Adventurer’s need for flexibility. A relationship between these two types can work only if both sides make an effort to accept each other’s differences.

Friendship

A friendship between ISFPs and ESTJs is not as unlikely as a romantic relationship, but may still present some issues. ESTJs are outgoing and talkative, while ISFPs prefer to keep to themselves. Although the Adventurer may find it exhausting to keep up with the enthusiastic ESTJ, it may also be beneficial for both types. ISFPs can learn to appreciate straightforwardness and not taking everything personally, while ESTJs can learn to tone down their extroversion if it becomes too much for others.

At Work

In a workplace setting, the two types can work toward a common goal, as they share a focus on the concrete and practical. However, their differing communication styles may cause friction, as ISFPs will likely see ESTJs as too blunt and overbearing. If the freedom-loving Adventurer feels that their autonomy is threatened, they may react by internalizing without sharing their frustration, which could cause misunderstandings.

ISFP and ESFJ

These two types are in the “green zone” of the compatibility chart. They share a lot of their views and attitudes, but also have a few differences that can complement each other and help them grow in a relationship.

Romantic Relationship

A relationship between an ISFP and ESFJ can work well, as they share many key characteristics and have some intriguing differences. Both are caring and sensitive, so their shared life will probably be harmonious. The organized and systematic ESFJ may struggle to accept the spontaneity of the Adventurer personality at first but, with a bit of work, ESFJs can learn to be more flexible, while ISFPs can become more dependable.

Friendship

These two types share a similar worldview, with a focus on the practical and tangible side of life, which could help them connect as friends. Both types are considerate and expect the same from others, so they may appreciate each other’s sensitivity. The extroverted and gregarious ESFJs are drawn to lively social gatherings, while ISFPs prefer smaller groups, but this difference is unlikely to deter either if their friendship is strong.

At Work

ISFPs and ESFJs can get along well in a work environment if their roles reflect their differing approaches to tasks. Both types are compassionate and are often drawn to social work and other helping professions. This could make them a great team, as long as ESFJs are more focused on the planning and communication side of the work, while ISFPs are given space to define their own approach.

ISFP and ISTJ

These two types are in the “yellow zone” of the compatibility chart. Although they have some things in common, their differences may cause friction and require some work in a relationship.

Romantic Relationship

ISFPs and ISTJs both tend to be private and reserved. While this is a similarity that can help them connect, it can also present problems in a romantic relationship. If neither shares their feelings directly, things could be left unsaid, causing friction to build up. This is especially problematic if ISTJs, who tend to be coldly analytical, are perceived as insensitive by the emotionally aware ISFPs.

Friendship

As Introverts, both types may share a preference for small groups instead of large social events. Their worldviews are similar, as both tend to be down-to-earth and focused on the present. A friendship between them can work if they accept each other’s differing ways of communicating. The systematic ISTJ may also benefit by being introduced to new experiences by the novelty-seeking ISFP.

At Work

The workplace needs and habits of these two types differ quite a bit. ISTJs do best in settings that provide a steady routine and a structured workflow. ISFPs, on the other hand, prefer to have the freedom and flexibility to do the work in their own way and not be pressured by strict rules and schedules. However, both types prefer to deal with real-world matters, rather than hypotheticals, which can be a point of connection.

ISFP and ISFJ

These two types are in the “blue zone” of the compatibility chart. They share most of their views, beliefs, and interests, so they may get along seamlessly and relate on an intuitive level.

Romantic Relationship

ISFPs and ISFJs share three of their preferences, so it makes sense that getting along as a couple should not be an issue for them. They have similar worldviews, as both are sensitive and observant. ISFPs are more spontaneous, while ISFJs are more organized, which could be a point of contention, but it could also help them achieve a good balance. The Adventurer can bring more adaptability to the couple, while ISFJs can take care of long-term planning.

Friendship

The two types’ shared values and attitudes can also help them establish a good friendship. Both are sensitive and look for ways to help others, so as friends they are bound to appreciate each other’s kindness. ISFPs and ISFJs can also connect on their down-to-earth attitude and aversion to abstract topics.

At Work

Both ISFPs and ISFJs are tuned to the emotional context of a situation, so they are kind and considerate colleagues. Their main difference is in their preference for order and predictability – ISFPs want less of it, while ISFJs want more. ISFPs are more adaptable, while ISFJs are more organized. As a team, their collaboration can be fruitful if each takes matters into their own hands when their approach to tasks is called for.

ISFP and ESTP

These two types are in the “green zone” of the compatibility chart. They share a lot of their views and attitudes, but also have a few differences that can complement each other and help them grow in a relationship.

Romantic Relationship

ISFPs and ESTPs have similar worldviews, so a relationship between the two may work well. Both types are focused on the information coming in through their senses – they are always on the lookout for new experiences. As a couple, they may satisfy each other’s need for adventure. However, ESTPs are a lot more gregarious, while ISFPs tend to be private and reserved, which could cause some incongruity in their social life.

Friendship

In a friendship, the two types can connect on their quest for novel sensations and their focus on reality as they see it here and now. Both ISFPs and ESTPs are action-oriented and dislike discussions that deal with the abstract or theoretical. Some tension may arise around their differing views on emotional expression. ISFPs are very considerate and they may perceive ESTPs’ direct communication as too blunt or insensitive.

At Work

Both of these types are spontaneous and adaptable, so they may be a good team when having to deal with unpredictable situations at work. They may collaborate well when a task requires a creative solution, but when it comes to long-term planning and jobs that require a more systematic approach, the two types may benefit from having someone more orderly on their team.

ISFP and ESFP

These two types are in the “blue zone” of the compatibility chart. They share most of their views, beliefs, and interests, so they may get along seamlessly and relate on an intuitive level.

Romantic Relationship

ISFPs and ESFPs are a good match for a romantic relationship because they share a general attitude towards life. Both live in the present and favor practical considerations over conceptual musings. Both types are emotionally aware and thoughtful, so disagreements between them are likely to be addressed with sensitivity and consideration. They may have some difficulty with planning as a couple, as both like to be spontaneous.

Friendship

As friends, ISFPs and ESFPs tend to connect on a deep level without much effort, because of their shared worldview. Both are impulsive or get bored easily, so they will be on the same page when it comes to having fun. However, as an introvert, the Adventurer is a lot more reserved and prefers small groups of friends while, as an extrovert, the ESFP is outgoing and talkative. This difference could cause some friction, but it could also be an opportunity for both to explore their limits when it comes to socializing.

At Work

As with other pairs of Perceiving types, ISFPs and ESFPs are likely to find it easy to work together, as both are adaptable and dislike routine. The two types tend to approach tasks creatively and don’t like strict rules and procedures. This could cause challenges if some aspects of their jobs require a more systematic approach.

ISFP and ISTP

These two types are in the “blue zone” of the compatibility chart. They share most of their views, beliefs, and interests, so they may get along seamlessly and relate on an intuitive level.

Romantic Relationship

This is another pair of types that can work well as a couple because of their similar values and interests. ISFPs and ISTPs are both private and action-oriented, so they will probably prefer to spend time with each other, pursuing enjoyable activities as opposed to long discussions. However, ISFPs tend to be more loyal and devoted, while ISTPs dislike commitments, which could cause issues in a romantic relationship.

Friendship

ISFPs and ISTPs are both easygoing and adventurous, so they may enjoy each other’s company and easily find fun things to do together. Although both types seek out novel experiences, the thrill-seeking ISTPs may be a bit more prone to risky behaviors than ISFPs. One difference between the two is that ISTPs emphasize rational arguments when making decisions, while ISFPs favor more emotional considerations, which could cause misunderstandings.

At Work

Both types prefer solitary work that provides enough space to determine one’s own approach to tasks. They value their autonomy and don’t like to feel controlled. But the two may have different ways of dealing with a project – ISFPs tend to enjoy work that touches on emotional expression, while ISTPs like work that requires logical thought.

ISFP and ISFP

These two types are in the “blue zone” of the compatibility chart. They share most of their views, beliefs, and interests, so they may get along seamlessly and relate on an intuitive level.

Romantic Relationship

Being in a relationship with someone of the same psychological type does not necessarily guarantee the two will get along. But in the case of ISFPs, they most likely will. The Adventurer is kind and thoughtful, but they also expect the same from others, so two individuals of this type have all the necessary conditions for a harmonious shared life. One difficulty for them may be their common disinterest in planning, which could hinder the couple’s ability to achieve their common goals.

Friendship

As friends, two ISFPs will probably click right away and connect on their desire to explore and experience new things. Each one can expect the other’s help when in need, and their loyalty to those close to them ensures a dependable comradery. Their friendship is likely to be based on shared activities rather than lengthy conversations.

At Work

Two ISFPs working together can achieve a lot if they are given enough creative space and the job is not overly structured or repetitive. Since ISFPs’ focus on the present can make it difficult for them to gain perspective and take systematic steps towards a future goal, it may be a good idea for someone outside of the ISFP team to keep an eye on the big picture.

ISFP and ENTJ

These two types are in the “red zone” of the compatibility chart. They differ greatly in their worldviews, which can cause a clash between them and require a lot of work to achieve a harmonious relationship.

Romantic Relationship

ISFPs and ENTJs are complete opposites when it comes to their preferences, so it makes sense that the two types have little in common. ENTJs tend to be direct and assertive, which could be perceived as forcefulness by the sensitive and considerate ISFP. This can cause problems in a romantic relationship, especially since ISFPs tend to withdraw when offended, so issues may not be discussed in a timely manner.

Friendship

A friendship between these two types is possible but unlikely, as their worldviews differ significantly. ISFPs are usually exhausted by large social gatherings, while ENTJs thrive in them. What’s more, ISFPs prefer to engage in shared activities and focus on the concrete, while ENTJs are talkative and more interested in abstract and theoretical matters.

At Work

ISFPs crave freedom and are willing to get out of their comfort zone to defend themselves if threatened. ENTJs are also known as Generals and like to be in charge, so it’s not surprising that ISFPs may perceive ENTJs as overbearing in a workplace setting. Although ISFPs may benefit from a bit more structure in their job, ENTJs should be careful not to become too controlling, as this can bring out the Adventurer’s rebellious side.

ISFP and ENTP

These two types are in the “red zone” of the compatibility chart. They differ greatly in their worldviews, which can cause a clash between them and require a lot of work to achieve a harmonious relationship.

Romantic Relationship

The ENTP is another personality type that the typical ISFP has little in common with. The two types simply view the world in different ways. ENTPs are looking for meaning and patterns in the events they observe, while ISFPs focus on things as they are at this very moment, which may create a disconnect between the two in a relationship. Further complicating their attempts at communication, ENTPs tend to base their actions on rational considerations, while ISFPs follow their principles and care for people’s emotions.

Friendship

As with romantic relationships, these two types may find it hard to connect because of their differing worldviews. ISFPs are quiet and observant, so they usually stay out of heated discussions. ENTPs, on the other hand, are outgoing and talkative; they love debating, sometimes for their own sake. Although both types share a need for spontaneity, they may express it in different ways.

At Work

In the workplace, the two types may work best if their duties do not overlap very much. ENTPs are interested in hypotheticals, while ISFPs would rather concentrate on the concrete so, in an ideal situation, their responsibilities should reflect their differing focus. That said, both types thrive when they are given creative freedom and flexibility.

ISFP and INTJ

These two types are in the “red zone” of the compatibility chart. They differ greatly in their worldviews, which can cause a clash between them and require a lot of work to achieve a harmonious relationship.

Romantic Relationship

ISFPs and INTJs are two types known for their reserved demeanor, which makes it hard to get to know them. But that’s pretty much where their similarities end. ISFPs live in a world of sense perceptions and concrete phenomena, while INTJs look for meaning and connections between events. This can make it hard for them to connect on a deeper level, and consequently decreases their chances of a fulfilling relationship.

Friendship

A friendship between these two types may present challenges because of their contrasting values and interests. ISFPs prefer to engage in fun activities with their friends, while INTJs would rather discuss ideas. Although both types are good at listening, ISFPs may feel unappreciated and even offended by the straightforward and analytical INTJs.

At Work

These two types differ in their preferred work environment. The ISFP personality type likes to have freedom and flexibility while, as a Judger, the INTJ prefers orderly and structured work. Also, ISFPs are more comfortable when their creativity is put to good use. INTJs, on the other hand, favor jobs that make use of their considerable analytical abilities. They may be able to work together if tasks are delegated according to their talents.

ISFP and INTP

These two types are in the “yellow zone” of the compatibility chart. Although they have some things in common, their differences may cause friction and require some work in a relationship.

Romantic Relationship

ISFPs and INTPs differ in their way of thinking, which means that a relationship between them can work only if each one makes an effort to understand the other’s point of view. ISFPs are emotionally aware and observant, while INTPs often spend a lot of time in their heads and focus on logical connections. ISFPs should make sure to be straightforward enough that their partner understands them, while INTPs need to remember that their disregard for emotion can be hurtful.

Friendship

Given both ISFPs and INTPs are private and enjoy their alone time, they tend to be slow in forming and cementing friendships. This could make social interaction between them challenging since they also have differing interests. The practical and down-to-earth ISFPs may struggle to connect with INTPs who prefer to discuss ideas and look for solutions to complex problems.

At Work

ISFPs and INTPs both appreciate their independence in the workplace, so when working together they are likely to respect each other’s boundaries. The two types also share adaptability to change, which can help them work together in unpredictable situations. However, ISFPs tend to approach problems with immediate action, while INTPs prefer to interpret and analyze information.

ISFP and ENFJ

These two types are in the “yellow zone” of the compatibility chart. Although they have some things in common, their differences may cause friction and require some work in a relationship.

Romantic Relationship

As a couple, these two types are likely to connect on their mutual need for affection and understanding. Both ISFPs and ENFJs are kind and supportive, so communication between them should be smooth. At least for the most part. However, the two differ in the way they interpret information – ISFPs are focused on the present, while ENFJs tend to consider the future implications of current events. This could cause some dissonance in their relationship.

Friendship

As friends, ISFPs and ENFJs are both warm and considerate. Each one will appreciate the other’s care, which could help them form a strong bond. But they differ in their tolerance for social stimulation. ISFPs need to recharge after social gatherings, while ENFJs are one of the most outgoing personality types. This could make it challenging for them to find common ground.

At Work

ISFPs and ENFJs may very well cross paths in their careers, as both types prefer work where they can help others. However, ENFJs’ gregarious and orderly nature makes them more likely to focus on resolving conflicts and organizing group events. ISFPs would rather work independently and assist others in more tangible ways, so the two may work best when their duties are in line with their competencies.

ISFP and ENFP

These two types are in the “green zone” of the compatibility chart. They share a lot of their views and attitudes, but also have a few differences that can complement each other and help them grow in a relationship.

Romantic Relationship

A relationship between an ISFP and an ENFP may work well because both types are caring, sensitive, and spontaneous. They are bound to find enjoyable ways to spend their time together. The two types differ in their focus when looking at the world – ISFPs see things as they are now, while ENFPs see future possibilities. But since both are kind and considerate, this difference can help them achieve a more comprehensive view of the world as a couple.

Friendship

ISFPs and ENFPs are likely to appreciate each other’s emotional sensitivity, so they can become good friends. However, the introverted ISFPs may get exhausted by ENFPs’ ceaseless enthusiasm and need for socializing. That aside, both types like to pursue novel experiences, which help them form strong connections.

At Work

Both ISFPs and ENFPs dislike following strict rules and procedures, so they can work together harmoniously without feeling pressured to conform. The two types are creative and adaptable, which could help them collaborate effectively on problems that require quick solutions. But the two may struggle with tasks that are routine or require sticking to a plan, so external help with these may be needed.

ISFP and INFJ

These two types are in the “yellow zone” of the compatibility chart. Although they have some things in common, their differences may cause friction and require some work in a relationship.

Romantic Relationship

Both ISFPs and INFJs are warm, empathetic, and averse to conflict, so communication between them is bound to be tactful and courteous. Both value sincerity and authenticity, which could put them on the same page when it comes to sharing with each other. However, both types are quiet and reserved, so discussing issues that come up in the relationship may sometimes be put off and tension may build up.

Friendship

As friends, ISFPs and INFJs can connect on their sensitivity, but they may have some difficulty finding topics they both care about. ISFPs are more focused on real-world issues and tend to prefer relating to others through common activities, while INFJs tend to prefer philosophical discussions and focusing on ideas and potentials.

At Work

ISFPs and INFJs are both creative and artistic types – qualities that they want to be able to express in their professional life. Their sensitivity should help them get along at the job, but they may have different needs when it comes to structure. As a Perceiver, the ISFP type likes more flexibility and autonomy, while the INFJ prefers to rely on a clear organization.

ISFP and INFP

These two types are in the “green zone” of the compatibility chart. They share a lot of their views and attitudes, but also have a few differences that can complement each other and help them grow in a relationship.

Romantic Relationship

These two types have a lot of similarities. In fact, they are often mistaken for one another. They are both artistic and compassionate, so they can get along well as a couple. Loyalty and sensitivity are important to both ISFPs and INFPs, which could ensure that a romantic relationship between them is stable and committed. However, ISFPs are more practical, while INFPs are more idealistic, so they may not always relate to each other intuitively.

Friendship

These two types can be caring and thoughtful friends, as both value harmony and forming a genuine connection between people. As with romantic relationships, they may differ in their way of interpreting information. ISFPs are more down-to-earth and take things at face value, while INFPs are idealistic and look for hidden meanings. But this difference could also help them develop their weaker cognitive functions.

At Work

Both ISFPs and INFPs rely on their values and principles when making decisions, so in a shared work environment, they are bound to appreciate each other’s authenticity. They should be able to work together smoothly, as long as each is given enough space to focus on their area of interest – more practical for ISFPs and more conceptual for INFPs.