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ENFP Relationships with other MBTI Types

The Optimist (ENFP) is probably the most colorful MBTI personality. Their enthusiastic and warm character is like a magnet for attracting people toward them – but not everyone is as awe-struck with them as people would imagine. This article will take a closer look at the ENFP relationship compatibility with the other personality types. Other questions that will be answered below are:

  • What is the ENFP partner like?
  • What is the best match for an ENFP?
  • Which types make the best friends for ENFPs?
  • Which types have a good work dynamic with ENFPs?
Do you know your personality type? Take our free personality test to find out.

ENFP Relationships and Dating

The ENFP personality type takes their personal relationships very seriously. They are very caring individuals who are ready to give 110% for the people they love. While they might not be the most practical people, ENFPs are adept at giving emotional support and are able to deeply empathise with people. This makes them a warm and comforting presence, to which others are attracted to. ENFPs strive to connect to people in meaningful ways and are not interested in maintaining shallow relationships. In any relationship, they are energetic, enthusiastic and encouraging, placing great importance on authenticity and idealism.

You can read a more detailed analysis of ENFP traits and characteristics here.

ENFP Dating

ENFPs are romantic people, who like to flirt and can fall in love too easily. However, these feelings aren’t important to them just on a surface level – ENFPs have deep inner morals and values when it comes to a romantic relationship. In a way, they want to find someone who they can completely devote themselves to, who can accept them as they are and who respects their freedom. ENFPs are drawn to sincerity and genuine reactions. Nothing puts them off more than someone pretending to be something they are not – ENFPs can appreciate a person without judging them, no matter who they may be.

ENFP Best Match

The best matches for ENFPs in a romantic sense are INTJs and INFJs. A match with either of these personality types is very beneficial for an ENFP, as they compliment each other’s strengths and  weaknesses. Even though they appear worlds apart from ENFPs, this is a good thing, as both sides have plenty of opportunities to grow in the relationship and see the world from a completely different point of view to their own.

Some other types that pair up nicely with ENFPs are: ESFP, ENTJ and INTP.

ENFP Compatibility

It seems like ENFPs can have a good relationship with any other Myers Briggs Personality type. However, some types aren’t attracted to their cheerful and energetic personality and can easily find them loud, annoying and immature. Typically, ENFPs get along better with Intuitive types, rather than Sensing ones. The rest of the article addresses ENFP’s relationship compatibility with each other MBTI type – what works and what doesn’t in terms of romance, friendship and work.

ENFP Compatibility Chart

To illustrate ENFP’s compatibility with other personality types, we have made a chart, divided per each temperament type. The color coding for the chart is as follows:

Blue – types that are most similar to ENFPs in terms of values, interests and life philosophy.
Green – types that are quite similar to ENFPs but have intriguing differences, which can produce a healthy relationship with plenty of personality growth opportunities.
Yellow – types that are somewhat similar to ENFPs and could be compatible with them, but some work will be needed to make things work.
Red – types that are poles apart from ENFPs and are likely to clash with their personality. Relationships between these types will require a lot of work.

ENFP Compatibility Chart

 

ENFP and ESTJ

These two personality types fall in the “red zone” in the compatibility chart. They don’t have much in common and their widely contrasting views on life can cause friction between them.

Relationship 

A relationship between these two personality types could be very rocky, because of their differing views of the world. The idealist ENFP with their tendency to daydream might not sit well with the grounded ESTJ. When it comes to making big decisions, there could also be a clash between the flexible and adventurous ENFP and the cautious, change-wary ESTJ. These differences can result in ENFPs viewing ESTJs as dull and unimaginative, and the latter thinking that they are flighty and impractical. However, these mismatched characteristics could be beneficial – they inspire individuals to grow and see other points of view.

Friendship

ENFPs and ESTJs have varying values when it comes to friendship too. ENFPs are better at providing emotional support to their friends and prefer to connect with them on such a level. ESTJs on the other hand are more practical and would be quick to offer a logical solution to a problem, rather than try to empathise with the other person. To an ENFP this can come across as cold-hearted and insensitive, and as a deeply sensitive type, they wouldn’t be able to fully comprehend this type of reaction. If they try to, however, this contrast in values can benefit both sides.

At Work

While ENFPs are creative people, ESTJs value rules, order and structuring work. This doesn’t sit well with freedom loving ENFPs and they can be quick to react negatively to such bureaucracy. They prefer working in short bursts of energy, rather than methodically structuring their workday, which in turn is what ESTJs are all about. This major difference in working styles could be beneficial, as each of those two personality types compliment the strengths and weaknesses in the other. However, it could also cause great frustration if they don’t take the time to adjust to a working balance that allows each of them to prosper.

ENFP and ESFJ 

These two types fall in the “yellow zone” of the compatibility chart. They have some similarities in their characters, but problems may occur as they don’t balance each other out and may decide to ignore potential issues.

Relationship 

ENFP and ESFJ are both very caring, sensitive and warm personality types. They don’t have troubles expressing how they feel and on the contrary – this is very important to them. This can build a very harmonious relationship, in which conflict rarely occurs – neither ENFPs nor ESFJs  enjoy confontations and will try to avoid them best they can. However, this can result in them consciously avoiding talking about difficult but necessary topics. The contrast between their Sensing and Intuition preferences could also make it hard to find topics to discuss over time.

Friendship

These two types have the same energy levels, which makes them enjoy similar activities and social situations. They are both very people-oriented and enjoy hearing out each other’s feelings and experiences. However, ENFPs and ESFJs differ greatly in their way of thinking about life. ENFPs always seem to have their head in the clouds, which could annoy a Sensing type such as an ESFJ. Sensing types prefer to live in reality and rarely give thought to theoretical and abstract concepts. Overly-organized ESFJs can also have an issue with the easygoing nature of ENFPs, who don’t like planning ahead and enjoy spontaneity.

At Work

ESFJs are good at focusing on details, whereas ENFPs often see the big picture and practice high levels of originality and creativity. Both personality types care about their colleagues on a deeper level (given that they are Feeling types) and can make for caring leaders. ESFJs compliment many of an ENFPs weaknesses – they are more orderly and organized than them, and can provide them with a clear work structure. This could be very helpful for the hectic ENFP but too much micromanaging and limiting their freedom isn’t a good idea. ENFPs like to have room for flexibility but can still appreciate the sort of guidance they can use to steer them in the right direction.

ENFP and ISTJ

These two personality types fall in the “red zone” of the compatibility chart. They don’t have much in common and their widely contrasting views on life can cause friction between them.

Relationship 

ENFP and ISTJ are polar opposites – they don’t have any preference in common. This is why, in a relationship, each type’s attraction to their opposite qualities can be very bonding. ISTJs can see ENFPs as a warm, supportive and an optimistic energy in their lives, whereas ENFPs can see ISTJs as a source of stability, common sense and maturity. However, the balance between these two is delicate and they need to remember how different they are, and not to get frustrated over that. An ENFP would never live by a schedule, nor be objectively critical – and they shouldn’t be angry that an ISTJ will.

Friendship

ENFPs and ISTJs make unlikely friends – given that they have virtually nothing in common. The ISTJ personality is likely to form an initial dislike toward the loud, energetic and messy nature of an ENFP. They will probably see them as highly illogical people who let their emotions guide them and thus are very childlike and immature. These feelings are mutual- an ENFP is likely to think that ISTJs are stuck up, cold and boring people. If they manage to get over their initial judgement of each other, these two can greatly benefit from the difference in perspective they can give each other.

At Work

ENFPs and ISFJs have very different mentalities and approaches to work. While ISFJs are methodical, organized and have a strong desire to meet set expectations, ENFPs are chaotic, people-centric and are good at generating ideas, without acting on them. In a way these two complement each other’s differences quite well, but their difference in energy levels can sometimes be hard to comprehend. ENFPs are team players and enjoy working together with others, while ISFJs prefer to be left alone – which is something that ENFPs can have trouble fully understanding. Something both types agree on is their dislike for being managed.

ENFP and ISFJ

These two personality types fall in the “red zone” of the compatibility chart. They don’t have much in common and their widely contrasting views on life can cause friction between them.

Relationship 

ENFPs and ISFJs are quite different from one another, which is exactly what can draw them to each other. The grounded nature of an ISFJ can be very comforting to the scattered ENFP and ISFJs can appreciate the excitement and unpredictability that ENFPs bring to their lives. These two are very committed personality types so they will have no trouble giving and receiving plenty of affection to and from one another. However, this is a relationship that may require some work – an ISFJ shows love by practically attending to their partner’s needs, while ENFPs dwell on a more emotional side. Understanding these differences is key to making this pairing work.

Friendship

Both ENFPs and ISFJs are very accommodating to other people’s feelings – including each other’s. The shy nature of the ISFJ personality is gladly willing to go along with most of the adventurous ideas that the ENFP friend always seems to have – as long as they don’t require them to step too far from their comfort zone. Both these personality types are good at bringing people together and finding a way to compromise when conflict arises, which makes them understand one another on a deeper level. Sometimes it can be hard for an ENFP to comprehend why their ISFJ friend needs alone time but it’s essential that they give it to them.

At Work

When working, ISFJs tend to keep an keen eye on whether the team is moving in the right direction and often provide gentle nudges when needed. They aren’t very vocal but rather enjoy working behind the scenes and are very alert to small details. However, they are prone to being anxious about their work being done well enough. This is where ENFPs can help them and provide them with the needed emotional support and optimistic encouragement. These two can work smoothly together as long as ISFJs can adjust themselves to the highly energetic ENFP and ENFPs are willing to accept the guidance given by ISFJs.

ENFP and ESTP

These two types fall in the “yellow zone” of the compatibility chart. They have some similarities in their characters, but problems may occur as they don’t balance each other out and may decide to ignore potential issues.

Relationship 

ENFPs and ESTPs are both extremely social and easy going people who can make great partners. They are likely to have very active and fast-paced social lives, they may have many friends and interact with  various people in multiple settings. Both types are very open to excitement and new experiences, which makes it easy for them to enjoy life together. Both are very spontaneous and have a “go with the flow” mentality, which means that they dislike too much planning ahead. On the downside, the pragmatic ESTP can have trouble understanding the emotionally rich inner world of the ENFP, which could cause problems.

Friendship

In a friendship, an ESTP can deeply appreciate the nurturing and caring affection of an ENFP. As people pleasers, ENFPs always take special care that their friends are feeling good and included, and are prepared to take all necessary action to make this happen. In return, ENFPs are drawn to the bold and adventurous spirit of the ESTPs – as they are always on the lookout for excitement. These types compliment each other’s energy levels well and have similar values, which can make them the perfect partners in crime. ESTPs should be careful how they deliver their opinions and feelings – their straightforwardness could easily hurt a sensitive ENFPs emotions.

At Work

ENFPs and ESTPs direct their energy in the same way but they use it in very different ways. ESTPs are very action-oriented and don’t waste too much time strategizing – they seek to get things done as fast as possible, in order to get even more things done after that. In relation, a notorious ENFP trait is procrastination. However, they can produce incredible amounts of work when inspiration strikes them. They have difficulties keeping up with the fast work pace of ESTPs for too long, which ESTPs wouldn’t take too kindly. If these types manage to overcome these differences in how they handle work, they can become a very efficient team.

ENFP and ESFP

These two types fall in the “green zone” of the compatibility chart. They have quite a lot of similarities between each other, but at the same time possess enough differences to be able to learn from one another.

Relationship 

Both ENFPs and ESFPs are spontaneous and adventuristic. They share similarities in strengths and weaknesses, which makes them likely to get along well. Both types are enthusiastic, optimistic, energetic and passionate. ESFPs can teach ENFPs how to appreciate the aesthetics of life more, instead of being stuck in their heads. In return, ENFPs can teach ESFPs how to focus more on their future development, rather than on momentary gratification. As both types are very poor at organization and structuring different aspects of their lives, which can lead to them magnifying these weaknesses in each other, if they are not careful.

Friendship

A problem that ENFPs often have is that they tend to get too wrapped in their own thoughts, which can cause them to lose track of real life. The ESFP friend can be a very positive influence on them in that regard – they are very grounded in reality, but at the same time are very fun-loving and exciting people. These two types have a lot in common and are likely to get along nicely. Even though they have some fundamental differences in their primary cognitive functions, ENFPs having Extroverted Intuition and ESFPs being guided by Introverted Sensing, they still feel largely at ease with each other.

At Work

ENFP and ESFP are very charismatic, empathetic and flexible when it comes to the work environment. It’s easy to see how they can make a good team with efficient dynamics – the open-minded ENFPs are generators for innovative ideas, which then practical ESFPs can take and turn into reality. It’s hard for ENFPs to stay present in the task at hand, which is where ESFPs will gladly help them, and for all their energy, ESFPs aren’t as imaginative as ENFPs, which again fills a gap.

ENFP and ISTP

These two personality types fall in the “red zone” of the compatibility chart. They don’t have much in common and their widely contrasting views on life can cause friction between them.

Relationship 

ENFPs and ISTPs make for a complicated relationship. ENFPs are very impulsive, spontaneous and base a lot of their decisions purely on emotions. All of these don’t sit well with ISTPs, who make very calculated and practical decisions, based purely on facts and logic, rather than feelings. If an ISTP tries to confront his ENFP partner about these things, they may come across as insensitive and can even hurt ENFPs feelings deeply. What’s more, ISTPs can find it very difficult to keep up with the emotional expressiveness of ENFPs, which is likely to exhaust them greatly.

Friendship

Even though ENFPs and ISTPs are united by their mutual creativity and adaptability to unexpected situations, they are unlikely friends. ISTPs are realists and prefer action to simple words, while ENFPs can indulge in daydreaming and speculating about future possibilities for prolonged periods of time. ENFPs focus on emotions is also confusing to logic driven ISTPs. This can make it very difficult for them to relate to one another in critical moments. Ideally, these types can learn from their differences and use them to grow individually but sometimes they can find the rift between them too great.

At Work

Both of these types are very flexible and adapt to new environments and circumstances with ease. However, ISTPs are great with rational thinking and solving problems in a practical way, while ENFPs act more as creative innovators and leaders charged with empathy. Their differences regarding their perception of work can work well in filling the gaps in their expertise – ENFPs can influence ISTPs so that they think more of the human factor when work is concerned, and ISTPs can help ENFPs see the specifics of a situation more clearly.

ENFP and ISFP

These two types fall in the “yellow zone” of the compatibility chart. They have some similarities in their characters, but problems may occur as they don’t balance each other out and may decide to ignore potential issues.

Relationship 

ENFPs and ISFPs can make a very good pairing. They both share Introverted Feeling as a cognitive function, which means that they make decisions that are deeply in line with their personal values, feelings and beliefs. They both value their freedom greatly, which means that they are unlikely to try to control each other. Something else they share is their sense of adventure and passion for life. With this pairing, problems can arise if both sides are too connected to their personal sense of what is right and what is wrong. This can make them stubborn and unwilling to acknowledge the other’s point of view.

Friendship

These two types can also be dedicated friends. Initially ISFPs tend to be reserved toward people they don’t know, but this isn’t likely to discourage an ENFP. Both types value their freedom and they can easily recognise this in each other as a positive trait. They are both spontaneous and like having fun, so it won’t be hard for them to find an activity they both enjoy doing. Another trait that brings together ENFPs and ISFPs is their non-judgemental nature and willingness to accept people for who they are. They appreciate when they themselves are not judged back, which means that this friendship is likely to be a harmonious one.

At Work

ENFPs and ISFPs are both very flexible and empathetic workers. ISFPs are very practical and can often spot actionable solutions to problems, and they have a very deep aesthetic sense and eye for design. On the other hand, ENFPs can easily come up with an unorthodox and innovative idea and bring a certain charisma into the working environment. Both types can teach each other something – ISFPs can learn how to think outside the box and find a new way to channel their own creativity, while ENFPs can learn why details are important and how to find value in them.

ENFP and ENTJ

These two types fall in the “green zone” of the compatibility chart. They have quite a lot of similarities between each other, but at the same time possess enough differences to be able to learn from one another.

Relationship 

ENFPs and ENTJs can make for a very powerful and successful pairing. Both personality types are very passionate, ambitious and visionary, which compels them to always be on the lookout for escaping traditional convention. They share enough differences to be able to learn from each other – ENTJs can teach ENFPs how to be more organized toward reaching their goals, while ENFPs can teach ENTJs a lot about emotional sensitivity. Potential problems can occur if the ENTJ is not careful with how they present things to an ENFP – they are known for their directness, which can sometimes hurt their more sensitive partner.

Friendship

It’s easy for ENFPs and ENTJs to become friends. Both types share a love for deep and meaningful discussions, from which they often draw inspiration. This exchange of ideas and points of views can be very refreshing for both personalities, however ENFPs need to learn how not to take ENTJs’ criticism to heart. ENTJs often seek support in their friendships, which is exactly what ENFPs are more than willing to give. In a friendship, an ENFP will often nurture the ENTJ with their warmth and understanding, while an ENTJ will return the favor by providing objective and realistic feedback to the ENFPs ideas.

At Work

The ENTJ-ENFP team works fine because of their similar approach to work-related problems. They are both creative problem solvers and enjoy coming up with innovative solutions. While an ENTJ will often bring a strong drive for achievement and a rational mindset to the table, an ENFP compensates with an empathetic thought process, in which all members are considered, as well as a very flexible attitude. Both types succeed at complimenting each other’s flaws – ENTJs help ENFPs stay committed to a long-term project and ENFPs show ENTJs how to be more considerate of the human factor.

ENFP and ENTP

These two types fall in the “blue zone” of the compatibility chart. They share nearly identical world views, values, interests and life philosophy. They can also relate a lot to each other.

Relationship 

ENFPs and ENTPs share a lot of similarities in their strengths and weaknesses, which can both be a good and a bad thing when it comes to relationships. Both types are drawn to unusual and theoretical ideas, and deeply enjoy going beneath the surface of any topic. However, their differences in cognitive functions can result in ENTPs thinking that their ENFP partner is oversensitive, while an ENFP might think that ENTP is too detached. This can lead to both partners judging the other as being self-absorbed. They also need to be careful not to compound their shared weaknesses – devaluing routine and stability, for example.

Friendship

This pairing can also make for a good friendship, if both sides acknowledge each other’s differences. Both types are curious and enjoy exploring new horizons with their signature enthusiasm. They are never bored around one another, as it’s easy for their similarly wired minds to find a topic to discuss in-depth. ENTPs balance out the emotional side of ENFPs with their own rationality, which helps them both come up with even grander adventures. An issue that might occur is that neither personality type has any sense of boundaries and both are willing to sometimes go overboard with their personal beliefs.

At Work

ENFPs and ENTPs are natural generators of ideas. These types love discussing and brainstorming, and an ENTP will never shy away from challenging or debating over a given suggestion. When working together, this team can bring a lot of creative solutions, innovation and charisma to the workplace. ENTPs are also adept at taking a logical approach to the problem at hand, which ENFPs don’t entirely understand, but in return bring a lot of empathetic decision making to a situation. As they compliment each other’s flaws in such a good way, this dynamic duo can achieve many accomplishments.

ENFP and INTJ

These two types fall in the “green zone” of the compatibility chart. They have quite a lot of similarities between each other, but at the same time possess enough differences to be able to learn from one another.

Relationship 

ENFPs and INTJs make for a couple that, despite all odds, can work surprisingly well. Both types can be attracted to each other because of their strong interest in exploring possibilities and ideas. Both types are very independent and unconventional by nature. Despite being different to a large extent, ENFPs and INTJs somehow manage to bring the best out of each other. They are very dedicated to self-improvement and will acknowledge that in each other, giving the necessary space for growth. The key to making this pairing work is to get a better understanding of the other’s cognitive functions and accept that they operate in a different way.

Friendship

As friends, an ENFP and INTJ are also very compatible. ENFPs are constantly bombarding INTJs with new ideas, which they may find inspirational, while INTJs help their scattered friend focus on what is truly important for their development. Sometimes ENFPs need someone to bring them back to reality, which an INTJ isn’t afraid to do – they are honest friends, which aren’t afraid to give their opinion. On the other hand, INTJs always appreciate a shift in perspective, which might show them a piece of the puzzle they have been missing up to this moment – this is where ENFPs are more than happy to help out.

At Work

In a work environment, ENFPs and INTJs can create a dynamic team, who can make tremendous progress. As idea generators, ENFPs are never short on suggestions, however they can struggle to organize their thoughts and see a practical implication to them. This is where INTJs can help them to lay out a structured and logical plan of action, which can achieve the set goal. They are also good at helping ENFPs stay on track with projects, as this type is particularly prone to getting easily distracted.

ENFP and INTP

These two types fall in the “yellow zone” of the compatibility chart. They have some similarities in their characters, but problems may occur as they don’t balance each other out and may decide to ignore potential issues.

Relationship 

A relationship between an ENFP and an INTP can offer a big sense of comfort. Both types are laid back and open-minded, which results in neither wanting to control the other. This is very appreciated by both partners, as they value their individual freedom and flexibility. Both types like being involved in deep discussions and are likely to share the same type of humor. Problems in this couple can arise when they have to make a decision – in such cases the ENFP person is largely guided by their internal feelings, while an INTP takes a more impersonal and practical approach. This difference in methods can negatively affect the relationship, in cases where the partners aren’t mature enough to understand each other.

Friendship

ENFPs and INTPs share a lot of similarities on how they see the world around them. They will often have the same ideas and react in the same way to a situation they both find themselves in – however INTPs will prefer to keep silent, whereas an ENFP will externalize this opinion. This can bring those two types closer together, as it creates a bridge for the more socially awkward INTP and givest them conversation cues they can follow up on. Problems can arise when the more rational INTP can’t understand and can even get annoyed by the emotional sensitivity of an ENFP – but despite these differences, they make for great friends.

At Work

In the workplace, ENFPs and INTPs can be united by their mutual love for theorising and discussing innovative solutions to problems. They are likely to appreciate each other’s take on a problem and use their varying perspectives as a source of inspiration. They both like a certain extent of freedom in their work and appreciate being able to move things at their own pace. However, while for INTPs this pace is guided by logic, ENFPs are moved by deep emotion. It’s hard for these two types to fully comprehend this difference in their preferences, which in turn can lead to conflict.

ENFP and ENFJ

These two types fall in the “blue zone” of the compatibility chart. They share nearly identical world views, values, interests and life philosophy. They can also relate a lot to each other.

Relationship 

ENFPs and ENFJs appear very similar to one another on a surface level, which leads many to believe that this is a natural pairing. However, they don’t share any cognitive functions, which can make it a difficult relationship in the long run, as partners have big differences in their reasoning. These differences can create a right in any long-term relationship, leading to ENFPs perceiving ENFJs as judgmental and rigid, and ENFJ thinking that their partner is too immature and absent minded. Since they are so similar (sharing 3 preferences), they may think that they can change the other – which can lead to undesirable results.

Friendship

Both ENFPs and ENFJs are very friendly personality types and tend to prioritize their friendships. They are encouraging and supportive, possessing the ability to easily find a common ground with everyone. Their shared love for people and thrilling experiences, as well as preference for deep and meaningful conversations will certainly bring them closer together. They can help each other in overcoming the weak points in their personalities – for ENFPs that translates into staying focused and structured, and for ENFJs that is the inability to adapt to situational changes easily. Overall, this pairing makes better friends than a romantic couple.

At Work

In a work environment, it’s easier for ENFJs to mediate conflicts and find the common ground between differing opinions. They are also good at creating systems, schedules and managing people – which is something that ENFPs need, but aren’t fast to admit. As a personality type that values their freedom, ENFPs don’t like to be controlled too closely, but their proneness to distraction and procrastination often makes that necessary. These types can work well together as they are likely able to get the hang of each other’s working style and appreciate the boundaries each of them has.

ENFP and ENFP

These two types fall in the “blue zone” of the compatibility chart. They share nearly identical world views, values, interests and life philosophy. They can also relate a lot to each other.

Relationship 

The ENFP relationship with their own type can make for both very good and very bad pairing. Since they share the same cognitive functions, it’s easy for them to instinctively understand the other’s feelings and where they are coming from. They share the same values, same energy levels and it can feel that they have found someone that just “gets” them. Because of how similar they are, however, they can easily be too accepting of each other and forget to push their partner to grow or challenge themselves. They also share all of the same weaknesses, which can easily compound, as there is nothing to balance them out.

Friendship

Naturally, it’s easy for ENFPs to make friends with other ENFPs. They share a similar zest for life, easy-going nature and rich imaginations. They will rarely be bored around one another and are on the same page about what constitutes fun. It’s natural that they can relate to each other to such a big extent, however this can also be a bad thing for their personal growth. Since they’re so alike, it’s likely that they won’t have much to learn from one another and it’s possible that they also will feed their mutual bad habits. Nevertheless, ENFPs easily find kindred spirits among one another and connection between them is instant.

At Work

Putting ENFPs to work with each other can be an interesting experience. They can easily turn into creative machines, building on each other’s suggestions and coming up with new concepts. They are empathetic, charismatic and funny, finding it easy to find common ground with each other, as well as other coworkers. However, their poor planning and organizational skills and tendency for daydreaming and procrastination isn’t likely to get them far in more complex projects which require their close attention.

ENFP and INFJ

These two types fall in the “green zone” of the compatibility chart. They have quite a lot of similarities between each other, but at the same time possess enough differences to be able to learn from one another.

Relationship 

Even though ENFPs and INFJs don’t share any cognitive functions, they are a pairing with plenty of long-term potential. This is because they use their functions in exactly the same order – Intuition, Thinking, Feeling and Sensing. That means that they can constantly give each other unique perspectives in similar situations, leading to mutual fascination with one another. The ENFP-INFJ relationship balances each partner perfectly, which can lead to plenty of potential for personal growth. It’s easy for both partners to see the blind spots in the other and push them to develop in that direction – with the signature NF empathy, of course.

Friendship

ENFPs and INFJs also make for great friends. Their inverted cognitive functions compliment each other extremely well, which can often lead to ENFPs suggesting solutions that someone with an INFJ personality would never think of on their own, and vice versa. An interesting characteristic that they both share is their ambivertness – meaning that while ENFPs are considered to be extroverts, they need their wind down time, and introverted INFJs enjoy socializing to a certain extent. This makes it easy for them to tune into each other’s energy and enjoy doing virtually everything together. Both types prioritize their relationships so even if conflict occurs, they will do their part in resolving it quickly.

At Work

ENFPs and INFJs don’t have any problems working together. Again, this is a place where their inverted cognitive functions can work incredibly well together. These two types enjoy sharing ideas among each other and building up on them. INFJs can help keep ENFPs organized and inspire them to deliver their work in a more orderly manner. In return, ENFPs can push INFJs out of their comfort zone and motivate them to try new things or methods of work. Both types value harmony in the workplace and are very people-oriented, placing empathy above logic and cold rationality.

ENFP and INFP

These two types fall in the “blue zone” of the compatibility chart. They share nearly identical world views, values, interests and life philosophy. They can also relate a lot to each other.

Relationship 

ENFPs and INFPs share the same cognitive functions but prioritize them differently. This makes it very easy for them to understand each other and allows for a strong bond to quickly form between them. These types typically feel a heightened sense of comfort around each other and their shared empathy makes it easy to open up to one another. Some problems that can occur in this pairing is a sense of competitiveness between these two types – both want to be the more passionate and/or creative side of the relationship.

Friendship

ENFPs and INFPs seem to have an almost spiritual bond between each other. Communication between them flows effortlessly and they share similar values, worldview and sense of humor. Since they compliment each other’s dominant and auxiliary functions, the bond they share is very balanced and works well for both sides. Because of their natural connection, it’s often easy for one to put themselves in the position of the other and see where they are coming from. Overall, this friendship is likely to be harmonious and nurturing, for both sides.

At Work

Both personality types share a lot of common characteristics – they are very caring, think creatively and adapt to changes in their environment with ease. A significant difference between them is that while an ENFP is a social and inviting colleague, always eager to work in a team, the INFP person prefers to work alone and independently. This can cause some friction between them, as ENFPs often have trouble understanding how introversion works. However, as these types compliment each other well, they are likely to make a good team – with INFPs teaching ENFPs how to be better at listening and ENFPs showing them how to be more direct in their expression.